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SASS has a feature called @extend which allows a selector to inherit the properties of another selector, but without copying the properties (like mixins).

Does LESS have this feature as well?

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For clarification, the other question references does NOT ask the same thing. This question is simple: "Does LESS have an extend feature?". The other question is asking something that requires much more thought regarding styling decisions. –  jonschlinkert Mar 17 '13 at 20:42
    
... to add to my last comment, the other question includes the "coding-style" tag which further supports my point. –  jonschlinkert Mar 17 '13 at 20:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 83 down vote accepted

Yes, Less.js introduced extend in v1.4.0.

:extend()

Rather than implementing the at-rule (@extend) syntax used by SASS and Stylus, LESS implemented the pseudo-class syntax, which gives LESS's implementation the flexibility to be applied either directly to a selector itself, or inside a statement. So both of these will work:

.sidenav:extend(.nav) {...}

or

.sidenav {
    &:extend(.nav);
    ...
}

Additionally, you can use the all directive to extend "nested" classes as well:

.sidenav:extend(.nav all){};

And you can add a comma-separated list of classes you wish to extend:

.global-nav {
    &:extend(.navbar, .nav all, .navbar-fixed-top all, .navbar-inverse);
    height: 70px;
}

When extending nested selectors you should notice the differences:

nested selectors .selector1 and selector2:

.selector1 {
  property1: a;
   .selector2 {
    property2: b;
   }
}

Now .selector3:extend(.selector1 .selector2){}; outputs:

.selector1 {
  property1: a;
}
.selector1 .selector2,
.selector3 {
  property2: b;
}

, .selector3:extend(.selector1 all){}; outputs:

.selector1,
.selector3 {
  property1: a;
}
.selector1 .selector2,
.selector3 .selector2 {
  property2: b;
}

,.selector3:extend(.selector2){}; outputs

.selector1 {
  property1: a;
}
.selector1 .selector2 {
  property2: b;
}

and finally .selector3:extend(.selector2 all){};:

.selector1 {
  property1: a;
}
.selector1 .selector2,
.selector1 .selector3 {
  property2: b;
}
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11  
"LESS's syntax is more "faithful" to traditional CSS than the at-rule (@extend) syntax implemented by SASS and Stylus, which is typically reserved for giving instructions or directives to the CSS parser in the browser." <- what the heck is this supposed to mean? Smells like marketing speak. –  cimmanon Mar 17 '13 at 19:20
1  
let us continue this discussion in chat –  steveax Mar 17 '13 at 20:06
    
@cimmanon I guess you're right, I didn't mean it to sound that way. But there is a lot of controversy about Less's syntax, seemingly because people expected Less to use the same syntax as SASS. But in CSS, pseuso-selectors are used for pattern matching rules to determine which style rules apply to elements in the document tree, whereas at-rules are used for "higher-level" directives (as I mentioned). So maybe I should edit the answer to provide that detail? Or is that another question: "Why did LESS choose the pseudo-selector syntax?" –  jonschlinkert Mar 17 '13 at 20:31
4  
you should really update the less documentation online, I cannot see anything about :extend() and it would have been good to know earlier –  Josh Bambrick Jul 8 '13 at 18:26
1  
The documentation, as with the code, is community maintained. These kinds of suggestions would be great to have on the actual repo, and pull requests are always welcome ;-) –  jonschlinkert Jul 8 '13 at 22:54

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