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I started working with the PDF specification. PDF files are a mixture of text and binary data. To do some quick and dirty editing I would like to read the file into a string, find and replace some text parts, then write the string back to a file, while conserving all bytes except the ones I replaced.

My first naive attempt looked like this:

byte[] orignalBytes = ...; // read bytes from file
String content = new String(originalBytes, StandardCharsets.US_ASCII);
// do some find and replace (only working with ASCII chars)
byte[] changedBytes = content.getBytes(StandardCharsets.US_ASCII);

This fails because, quoting from the javadoc of the String constructor: "This method always replaces malformed-input and unmappable-character sequences with this charset's default replacement string".

I am looking for a special charset that maps all characters from the US_ASCII charset and in addition "keeps the values of all other bytes when converting from byte[] to String and back".

I only need to be able to work with ascii characters.

I am thinking of writing my own charset right now, but was wondering if something like that already exists?

Any ideas or pointers?

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1  
Just use ISO-8859-1 or any other 1-byte ASCII superset. –  Marko Topolnik Mar 17 '13 at 19:30
1  
Why not use a library that knows how to properly handle PDFs? apache pdfbox for example - pdfbox.apache.org –  radai Mar 17 '13 at 19:31
1  
The lower half ASCII characters would be 0-63, containing no letters, as all of ASCII is 0-127. I suspect you mean just ASCII though. –  Christoffer Hammarström Mar 17 '13 at 19:32
    
Marko: I will try that out. radai: money, of course. and I couldn't find a free PDF lib that supports PDF signing. Christoffer: You are correct, I will edit my question accordingly. –  Zalumon Mar 17 '13 at 19:34
    
@Zalumon PDFBox does support PDF signing in a basic fashion and is typically Apache free. IText supports supports PDF signing in a more comfortable way and can be used freely subject to the AGPL. Both know much better handling of PDF encoding than your approach. –  mkl Mar 18 '13 at 5:13

2 Answers 2

Each text string can have its own custom encoding. You will save yourself a LOT of trouble in the longrun using an existing PDF library.

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granted, but that is an entirely different discussion ;-) –  Zalumon Mar 18 '13 at 0:10

I tested Marko Topolnik's suggestion, it seems to work:

public class CharsetTest
{
  @Test
  public void test()
  {
    byte[] allByteValues = new byte[256];

    byte byteValue = Byte.MIN_VALUE;

    for(int i = 0; i < allByteValues.length; i++)
    {
      allByteValues[i] = byteValue;
      byteValue++;
    }

    {
      System.out.println(Arrays.toString(allByteValues));
      String string = new String(allByteValues, StandardCharsets.US_ASCII);
      System.out.println(string);
      byte[] bytesFromString = string.getBytes(StandardCharsets.US_ASCII);
      System.out.println(Arrays.toString(bytesFromString));
      System.out.println("equal: " + Arrays.equals(allByteValues, bytesFromString));
      System.out.println();

      Assert.assertFalse(Arrays.equals(allByteValues, bytesFromString));
    }
    {
      System.out.println(Arrays.toString(allByteValues));
      String string = new String(allByteValues, StandardCharsets.ISO_8859_1);
      System.out.println(string);
      byte[] bytesFromString = string.getBytes(StandardCharsets.ISO_8859_1);
      System.out.println(Arrays.toString(bytesFromString));
      System.out.println("equal: " + Arrays.equals(allByteValues, bytesFromString));
      System.out.println();

      Assert.assertTrue(Arrays.equals(allByteValues, bytesFromString));
    }
  }
}

The output on my eclipse console:

enter image description here

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