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I have a medium size database (~400,000 rows, 27 columns) that I need to search across most of the columns (25 of them) with the same criteria for comparison. I figured it would be more efficient to reshape/melt the data into the 'long' format, so I used the reshape2 package to generate a ~9,000,000 row/4 column dataset. Aside from taking a really long time (I only have 2GB of RAM), the reshaped file size was enormous: 500MB.

Is there a more efficient/less computationally intensive way of:

  1. Reshaping and storing wide to long data?
  2. Avoiding the reshaping at all and still searching across multiple columns with the same search criteria?
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closed as not a real question by agstudy, Arun, mnel, Iswanto San, Jack Humphries Mar 19 '13 at 2:08

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
There's no data in your post and it is too general. Without running on the data (reproducing it), there's no way to find out the problem (if any). And the answer to your second question is, yes you can search. Unless you can be specific (narrow down your question to data that's reproducible, and show us what output you're expecting.. in case the data's small). If it's big data (like yours), then you'll have to link us and maybe one of us can look into it. – Arun Mar 17 '13 at 20:07
    
@Arun Any basic wide to long transformation can easily illustrate my point. For example, the example by @Matthew below uses the Indometh dataset. I'm interested in searching across all the conc columns (0.25, 0.50, 0.75, etc) and searching for when when they're greater than 1.00, say. It's easier to convert this into the long format and searching based on this criteria than using the wide format. – semerj Mar 17 '13 at 22:23

This can happen.

From ?reshape

summary(Indometh)
wide <- reshape(Indometh, v.names = "conc", idvar = "Subject",
            timevar = "time", direction = "wide")


> dim(Indometh)
[1] 66  3
> dim(wide)
[1]  6 12
> 66*3    # long
[1] 198
> 6*12    # wide
[1] 72

What's happening, is that you have repeated values in the long format (here, Subject and time):

> head(Indometh)
  Subject time conc
1       1 0.25 1.50
2       1 0.50 0.94
3       1 0.75 0.78
4       1 1.00 0.48
5       1 1.25 0.37
6       1 2.00 0.19

> wide
   Subject conc.0.25 conc.0.5 conc.0.75 conc.1 conc.1.25 conc.2 conc.3 conc.4 conc.5 conc.6 conc.8
1        1      1.50     0.94      0.78   0.48      0.37   0.19   0.12   0.11   0.08   0.07   0.05
12       2      2.03     1.63      0.71   0.70      0.64   0.36   0.32   0.20   0.25   0.12   0.08
23       3      2.72     1.49      1.16   0.80      0.80   0.39   0.22   0.12   0.11   0.08   0.08
34       4      1.85     1.39      1.02   0.89      0.59   0.40   0.16   0.11   0.10   0.07   0.07
45       5      2.05     1.04      0.81   0.39      0.30   0.23   0.13   0.11   0.08   0.10   0.06
56       6      2.31     1.44      1.03   0.84      0.64   0.42   0.24   0.17   0.13   0.10   0.09
share|improve this answer
    
I realize this, but after multiplying the dimensions together for both formats, the long version is only ~3.7x larger (in dimension), not ~8x, like their relative file size. – semerj Mar 17 '13 at 22:13
    
I think the rest could have something to do with data compression, considering the data in each column looks more random in the wide format than in long. – flodel Mar 17 '13 at 23:41
    
@jsemer It would have been nice to give a clue in the question. Only one file size is listed. – Matthew Lundberg Mar 18 '13 at 0:50
    
@MatthewLundberg Original dataset (wide) filesize was 49MB and reshaped (long) version was 414MB. I should also note that it's a data frame, not a matrix. – semerj Mar 18 '13 at 1:19

Elaborating on my comment that, in addition to what @Matthew already described, data compression might play a decent role in why you are getting such different file sizes.

See this for example:

set.seed(1234)
A <- matrix(runif(1000), 1000, 1000, byrow = TRUE)
A <- A + runif(5)
B <- t(A)
save(A, file="A.RData")
save(B, file="B.RData")

The two data structures A and B contain the same data but transposed, yet the file sizes are quite different:

file.info("B.RData")$size / file.info("A.RData")$size
# [1] 97.38222

Why? It seems R's compression algorithm is (for the most part) exploring the data columnwise.

If I look at @Matthew's example, each individual column conc.* looks very random to me, i.e. hard to compress, although the original column conc might look less random to the compression algorithm.

share|improve this answer
    
This is certainly the key to the growth of his data that is not explained by the number of entries. Note that for my example, there is very little difference in the sizes of the disk files (690 vs. 668 bytes). – Matthew Lundberg Mar 18 '13 at 0:51

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