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So, I'm trying to generate an array of length 3 with random unique numbers from 1 to 25. I can't understand why my code isn't working and I'd greatly appreciate some help!

public void generateRandom() {
    for(int j=0; j<3; j++) {
        dots[j] = (int) (Math.random()*(col*row)+1);
        System.out.println(dots[j]);
        for(int i=j; i>0; i--) {
            if(dots[j]==dots[j-1]) {
                generateRandom();
            }
        }
    }
}

dots[] is the array which I am trying to store the 3 unique random numbers. By the way, col*row == 25.

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Wait... why use for in for and then recursivity? –  Bujanca Mihai Mar 17 '13 at 20:24

4 Answers 4

This is approach

public void generateRandom() {
    for(int j=0; j<3; j++) {
      boolean f;
      do { 
        dots[j] = (int) (Math.random()*(col*row)+1);
        f = false;
        for(int i=j-1; i>=0; i--) {
            if(dots[i]==dots[j]) {
              f = true;
              break;
            }
        }
        if (!f)
          System.out.println(dots[j]);
      } while (f);
   }
}

It's repeating the generation of the number until no duplicates found.

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for(int j=0;j<3;j++)
    dots[j]=(int)(Math.random()*Integer.MAX_VALUE)%25+1;

Since your Math.random is anyway a random number, multiplying by Integer.MAX_VALUE will not affect randomness. Also if you want an explanation of why does your code not work, that is because if the number is relatively small, say under 0.001, you will get 0 by getting the int when you multiply.

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Here is a bit different approach. It relies on creating an ArrayList with the specified set of values and then shuffling that list. Once the list is shuffled you can create an array based off of the first three elements in the shuffled list.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    for(int i = 0; i < 26; i++){
        list.add(i);
    }

    Collections.shuffle(list);
    Integer[] randomArray = list.subList(0, 3).toArray(new Integer[3]);

    for(Integer num:randomArray){
        System.out.println(num);
    }
}
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1  
Beat me to this approach. If the range is reasonably small, this is the straightforward way to implement this. –  millimoose Mar 17 '13 at 20:23

Every time generateRandom calls itself, it starts over from scratch with the first random number instead of picking a new random number for the current position.

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That shouldn't matter tho should it? Because regardless, eventually the array would fill itself with 3 random numbers. –  LowLanding Mar 17 '13 at 20:17
    
If that were the case, you wouldn't have a problem in the first place. –  Scott Hunter Mar 17 '13 at 20:19

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