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So I'm working on a threads project and I'm testing one of my files, making sure the structs and fields are getting the correct values. I am running this function:

struct ReportQueue {
   sem_t count;
   pthread_mutex_t mutexAdd;
   ReportList *RQList;
};

ReportQueue *RQCreate() {
   ReportQueue *rq;

   printf("RQCreate() called\n");
   rq = calloc(1, sizeof(ReportQueue));
   sem_init(&rq->count, 0, 0);
   pthread_mutex_init(&rq->mutexAdd, NULL);
   rq->RQList = NULL;
   return rq;
}

With this main:

int main() {
   ReportQueue *rQueue;
   Report report;

   rQueue = RQCreate();
   printf("SemCount: |%d| RQList: |%d| MutexAdd |%d|\n", rQueue->count, rQueue->RQList, rQueue->mutexAdd);
   printf("SemCount: |%d|\n", rQueue->count);
   printf("RQList: |%d|\n", rQueue->RQList);
   printf("MutexAdd: |%d|\n", rQueue->mutexAdd);

   return;
}

And I am getting this output:

RQCreate() called
SemCount: |0| RQList: |128| MutexAdd |0|
SemCount: |0|
RQList: |0|
MutexAdd: |0|

Which doesn't make any sense to me. The value of "RQList" should not change depending on how I print it out? What am I doing wrong?

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2  
Do you people mind helping me out please instead of voting down my question for reasons I don't know why? I think this is a valid question to be asked. To my knowledge, the value shouldn't change. –  Mike Mar 17 '13 at 21:26
    
what is RQList and why is it %d? Is it a decimal/int/numeric variable at all? –  Sergey Benner Mar 17 '13 at 21:32
2  
Use %p to print pointer values. –  hmjd Mar 17 '13 at 21:33
    
Well given my calloc call which initializes everything to 0 or NULL, I thought it would be ok to use %d as a valid format specifier to test the values. RQList is supposed to be a linked list of ReportLists. –  Mike Mar 17 '13 at 21:37
1  
I am unsure of the underlying types of sem_t and pthread_mutex_t. IIRC, a mismatch between argument type and format specifier is undefined behaviour. –  hmjd Mar 17 '13 at 21:44
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

a minimal example that works fine... this isn't an answer but shows that all seems ok

+ it didn't fit in a comment :D

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <semaphore.h>
#include <pthread.h>

struct ReportQueue {
   sem_t count;
   pthread_mutex_t mutexAdd;
   int *RQList;
};

struct ReportQueue *RQCreate() {
   struct ReportQueue *rq;

   printf("RQCreate() called\n");
   rq = calloc(1, sizeof(struct ReportQueue));
   sem_init(&rq->count, 0, 0);
   pthread_mutex_init(&rq->mutexAdd, NULL);
   rq->RQList = NULL;
   return rq;
}

int main() {
   struct ReportQueue *rQueue;

   rQueue = RQCreate();
   printf("SemCount: |%d| RQList: |%d| \n", rQueue->count, (int)rQueue->RQList);
   printf("SemCount: |%d|\n", rQueue->count);
   printf("RQList: |%d|\n", (int)rQueue->RQList);

   return 1;
}
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Thank you for your help! This works!! –  Mike Mar 17 '13 at 21:50
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Don't use %d to print out variables of type sem_t, pthread_mutex_t, or pointers. At best you'll get implementation defined behavior (if sem_t and pthread_mutex_t happen to be typedefs for int and pointers happen to be the same size as an int). But in general, you'll get undefined behavior since those types may have nothing to do with int - which is what %d tells printf() the corresponding argument's type is.

That's why the printf() calls produce output that doesn't make any sense. You're passing arguments to printf() that don't make any sense.

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