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I'm trying to write a method that will search the indices of an array called "items" to see if the same string is contained at more than one index (ignoring case). If a string is in the array more than once, the method should output a message and exit. With what I have now, the loop sometimes works and sometimes doesn't - for example, if the strings "house" and "hOuse" are stored, it won't catch it, although it should. I initially had break; after found = true; and thought removing it might help, but it didn't. Any advice?

public void equals() {
    boolean found = false;
    for (int i = 0; i < items.length; i++) {
        for (int j = 1; j > i && j < items.length; j++) {
            if (items[i].equalsIgnoreCase(items[j])) {
                found = true;
            }
        }
    }
    if (found) {
        System.out.println("You listed the same item more than once.  Please restart and try again.");
        System.exit(0);
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

Here's your problem

    for (int i = 0; i < items.length; i++) {
        for (int j = 1; j > i && j < items.length; j++) {

Change it to

    for (int i = 0; i < items.length; i++) {
        for (int j = i+1; j > i && j < items.length; j++) {

Reasoning: If i is say 2 and j is 1, j immediately is not > 1 and the inner loop immediately returns. This is obviously not what you want as it means comparisons only happen against the first string in the array.

And of course, since j now always > i, we can drop the check:

    for (int i = 0; i < items.length; i++) {
        for (int j = i+1; j < items.length; j++) {

Much better.

By the way, you can make your algorithm REALLY fast by adding all of your strings to a HashSet<String> ( http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/HashSet.html ) and checking the length of your HashSet vs the length of your original collection - if it's lower, there were duplicates. This will run in O(nlog(n)) instead of O(n^2)

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HashSet won't manage the case insensitive part... –  assylias Mar 17 '13 at 22:52
    
@assylias Insert lowercased versions of all the strings :) –  Patashu Mar 17 '13 at 22:53
    
+1 maybe no so important note but in the second for, you can drop "j > i" to increase clarity as its always true the way j is initialized. –  A.J. Mar 17 '13 at 22:53
    
@A.J True, added :) –  Patashu Mar 17 '13 at 22:54

You should change:

for (int j = 1; j > i && j < items.length; j++)

to

for (int j = i + 1; j < items.length; j++)

A shorter and easier way to write that method would be:

public void equals() {
    Set<String> set = new TreeSet<String> (String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER);
    set.addAll(Arrays.asList(items));
    if (set.size() != items.length) {
        System.out.println("You listed the same item more than once.  Please restart and try again.");
    }
}

And finally, to make your method reusable, you could write it like this:

public boolean hasDuplicatesIgnoreCase(String[] items) {
    ...
    return true / false;
}
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That works perfectly. Thanks so much! –  user2180462 Mar 18 '13 at 14:24

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