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When I type, for example, test \n test and try to use this code to write it

FILE *f = fopen(file, "w+");
fflush(f);
if (f==NULL) {
    //perror(f);
    return 0;
}
else{
    int i = fprintf(f, "%s", text);
    if (i>0) {
        fclose(f);

        return  1;
    }
    else{
        fclose(f);

        return 0;
    }
}

and then read it using this

FILE *f = fopen(file, "r");
static char c[100000];
const char *d;
if (f!=NULL) {
    if (fgets(c, 100000, f) !=NULL){
        d = c;
    }
    else{
        d = "No text";
    }
}
else{
    /*
     char *ff = f;
     perror(ff);
     */
    d = "File not found";
}
fclose(f);

return d;

it will only read and write test, not test, new line, test. Why won't this work?

share|improve this question
    
It's doing exactly what it says on the label. –  dmckee Mar 18 '13 at 2:00
    
"Why won't this work?" -- It does work. Read the documentation for fgets. Try calling that function twice. –  Jim Balter Mar 18 '13 at 2:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The fgets() function reads up to the first newline it encounters, or stops when it runs out of space to store the result, or when it gets EOF (so there is no more data to read).

A subsequent call to fgets() will collect the information after the first newline.

If you want to read it all at once, consider fread(). OTOH, there are issues you'll have to resolve there, too (notably: (1) you may ask for up to 1000 bytes, but only get back 20, so your code will have to handle short reads correctly; and (2) fread() will not null terminate the input string for you, unlike fgets() etc).

When it comes to writing, fwrite() would be the logical complement to fread(), but you can perfectly well continue using fprintf() and friends, or fputs(), or putc(), or any of the other standard I/O writing functions. There's no formal constraint on 'if you write with these functions, you must read with these other functions'. It depends on the nature of what you're writing and reading, but you are often at liberty to switch as seems most convenient.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but if I wanted to be able to read and write text with newlines, I would have to use fread() and fwrite()? –  Chris Loonam Mar 18 '13 at 2:00
1  
@ChrisLoonam: You'll have to explain how your separate lots of data with newlines embedded inside it are split up into readable units. There are a myriad ways to do it: for example, a 2-byte big-endian count could precede each unit of data, or each unit of data is marked by a null byte; or ... What works depends on context that hasn't been given. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 18 '13 at 2:03
1  
To put it simply, if the read operation isn't going to stop when it sees a newline, it has to stop some other way. You have to decide what that way is and write code to implement it. –  David Schwartz Mar 18 '13 at 2:05
    
@ChrisLoonam "if I wanted to be able to read and write text with newlines" -- That's what text files generally contain. Since they contain more than one line, one reads the lines in them by calling fgets more than once. –  Jim Balter Mar 18 '13 at 2:48

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstdio/fgets/

Reads characters from stream and stores them as a C string into str until (num-1) characters have been read or either a newline or the end-of-file is reached, whichever happens first.

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