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I've been writing a win32 wrapper class, and I've come across a problem: Because each instance of the class has a window, I've enclosed the this pointer in the user info space using SetWindowLongPtrW(), allowing me to call a message handler from the static WndProc function. This works fine: I can call the function. However, when I try to call another member function from the message handler, I get an access violation at 0x00000088 It does compile. I posted quite a lot, because to be honest I'm not too sure where the problem originates from... Please feel free to comment/criticize my code in general. Thanks for the help!

Here is the header:

#pragma once
#include <Windows.h>
#include "GlobalDefines.h"
#include "GraphicsWrapper.h"
#include "Keyboard.h"

namespace Startup
{

class GraphicsWrapper;

class WindowsWrapper
{
public:
    WindowsWrapper(HINSTANCE hInstance,
                   HINSTANCE hPrevInstance,
                   LPSTR lpCmdLine,
                   INT nCmdShow);
    ~WindowsWrapper();
    void EnterMsgLoop(GraphicsWrapper* Gfx);
    static LRESULT _stdcall WindowProc(HWND hWnd,
                                       UINT message,
                                       WPARAM wParam,
                                       LPARAM lParam);
    LRESULT _stdcall MessageHandler(HWND hWnd,
                                    UINT message,
                                    WPARAM wParam,
                                    LPARAM lParam);
    WNDCLASSEX WndClass;
    MSG Message;
    RECT Desktop;
    RECT Taskbar;
    RECT WindowCoordinates;
    LPSTR CommandLineArgs;
    INT CmdShow;
    HINSTANCE TheInstance;
    HWND WindowHandle;

    void InitializeWndClassEx();
    void InitializeWindowHandleHWND();
    void ShowWindowOnScreen();
    bool GetScreenRect(RECT & Desktop);
    bool GetTaskbarRect(RECT& rectTaskbar);
    bool GetWindowCoords(RECT& WindowCoordinates);
    int GetTaskbarSide();
    enum TaskbarSides
    {
        Top,
        Right,
        Bottom,
        Left
    };
    void SetFullScreen(bool Enable);
};

static IO::Keyboard * kbd;
}

And this is the relevant part of the implementation. I'll mark where the crash occurs.

void Startup::WindowsWrapper::InitializeWndClassEx()
{
    WndClass.hIcon = LoadIcon(TheInstance,(MAKEINTRESOURCE(IDI_MAIN_ICON) ) );
    WndClass.hIconSm = LoadIcon(TheInstance,(MAKEINTRESOURCE(IDI_MAIN_ICON) ) );
    WndClass.cbSize = sizeof(WNDCLASSEX);
    WndClass.style = CS_HREDRAW | CS_VREDRAW;
    WndClass.lpfnWndProc = WindowProc;
    WndClass.hInstance = TheInstance;
    WndClass.hCursor = LoadCursor(NULL, IDC_ARROW);
    WndClass.lpszClassName = L"WindowClassName";
    RegisterClassEx(&WndClass);
    SetWindowLongPtrW(WindowHandle, GWLP_USERDATA, (long)this);
}

void Startup::WindowsWrapper::SetFullScreen(bool Enable)
{

    long style = Enable ? WS_POPUP : WS_OVERLAPPED | WS_SYSMENU;
    static RECT windowRect = {};
    static bool needRect = true;

    if (needRect)
    {
        GetWindowRect(WindowHandle, &windowRect);
        needRect = false;
    }

    SetWindowLong(WindowHandle, GWL_STYLE, style);

    if (Enable)
    {
        SetWindowPos(WindowHandle, HWND_TOPMOST,
                     0,0,
                     GetSystemMetrics(SM_CXSCREEN),
                     GetSystemMetrics(SM_CYSCREEN),
                     SWP_SHOWWINDOW);
    }
    else
    {
        SetWindowPos(WindowHandle, 0,
                     windowRect.left,windowRect.top,
                     windowRect.right - windowRect.left,
                     windowRect.bottom - windowRect.top,
                     SWP_SHOWWINDOW);
    }
}

and

LRESULT CALLBACK Startup::WindowsWrapper::WindowProc
(
    HWND hWnd,
    UINT message,
    WPARAM wParam,
    LPARAM lParam
)
{
    WindowsWrapper* ourObjectPtr = NULL;
    long thisObject = GetWindowLongW(hWnd, GWLP_USERDATA);

    ourObjectPtr = (WindowsWrapper *)( (void*)thisObject);

    long Result = ourObjectPtr->MessageHandler(hWnd, message, wParam, lParam);
    RET(Result);

}

LRESULT _stdcall Startup::WindowsWrapper::MessageHandler
(
    HWND hWnd,
    UINT message,
    WPARAM wParam,
    LPARAM lParam
)
{
    switch(message)
    {
        case WM_DESTROY:
            PostQuitMessage(0);
            break;
        case WM_KEYDOWN:
            switch(wParam)
        {
            case VK_ESCAPE:
                PostQuitMessage(0); //Works fine here, but...
                break;
            case VK_SPACE:
                this->SetFullScreen(false); //Crashes here w/ access violation
                break;
            case VK_SHIFT:
                this->SetFullScreen(true); //Or here, w/ the same error.
                break;
        }           
    }
    return DefWindowProc(hWnd, message, wParam, lParam);
}

This is the createWindowEx call. Thanks for your help, again.

void Startup::WindowsWrapper::InitializeWindowHandleHWND()
{
WindowHandle = CreateWindowEx(NULL,
    L"WindowClassName",
            L"WindowTitle"
    WS_OVERLAPPED | WS_SYSMENU,
    WindowCoordinates.left, WindowCoordinates.top,
    WindowCoordinates.right, WindowCoordinates.bottom,
    NULL, NULL, TheInstance,
    CommandLineArgs);
}
share|improve this question
1  
Accessing a small memory address like that usually implies that a pointer to some object was NULL. –  Drew Dormann Mar 18 '13 at 2:32
    
Where is the CreateWindow call? and why is your SetWindowLong immediately post-class registration? What is the value of WindowHandle at that time, and have you bothered to debug to that point? –  WhozCraig Mar 18 '13 at 2:38
1  
You should use GetWindowLongPtr, not GetWindowLong, and use DWORD_PTR not long when you retrieve the window data - otherwise it will almost certainly fail in an x64 build. –  Jonathan Potter Mar 18 '13 at 2:41
1  
Because non-virtual function member access is not done through a vtbl-lookup. It is simply a function call, with an implicit push of the "this" pointer (which in your case is NULL). Therefore the moment you try to access a data member in that instance (which isn't an instance) you fault the process. It is undefined behavior, no doubt, but that is how what you're seeing happening is doing so. (and again, I ask: where is the CreateWindow() and where/when is the handle value for WindowHandle being set? For whatever reason you chose not to post that, and it is very relevant). –  WhozCraig Mar 18 '13 at 2:47
1  
@user2085046 and the WindowHandle used for SetWindowLongPtr is after that, correct? Do you realize that various messages are being sent through your registered WndProc before the CreateWindowEx call returns, and that you therefore are looking up a window-long-ptr value that hasn't yet been set (and is therefore filled with 0's, aka, a NULL)? I'm guessing you don't. –  WhozCraig Mar 18 '13 at 2:57

1 Answer 1

I have some code from a custom dialog handler I wrote quite a while back, which might be of use to you.

Same principle applies for a window but switch the WM_INITDIALOG for WM_CREATE and also replace DWLP_USER with GWLP_USERDATA. The format of the callback is subtley different too. You should be able to salvage almost all of this function though.

LRESULT CALLBACK CDialog::DlgProc( HWND hWndDlg, UINT msg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam )
{
    CDialog* pWindow;

    if( msg == WM_INITDIALOG ) {
        SetWindowLongPtr( hWndDlg, DWLP_USER, (LONG_PTR)lParam );
        pWindow = reinterpret_cast<CDialog*>( lParam );
        pWindow->m_hWnd = hWndDlg;
    } else {
        pWindow = reinterpret_cast<CDialog*>( (LPARAM)GetWindowLongPtr( hWndDlg, DWLP_USER ) );
    }

    if( pWindow != NULL ) {
        LRESULT ret = pWindow->OnMessage( msg, wParam, lParam );
        if( msg == WM_NCDESTROY ) pWindow->m_hWnd = NULL;
    }

    return FALSE;
}
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