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I have a TV class that has only 99 channel and 20 as the highest volume but my volume and channel setters are not working properly also when i add one to the volume instead of add 1 to 10 which is my default volume it only add one to the given volume digit my tv class

public class TV
{
    private String flag;
    private int ch;
    private int vol = 10;

    public TV(String onOffSwitch, int channel, int volume)
    {
        flag = onOffSwitch;
        ch = channel;
        vol = volume;
    }

    public void setFlag(String onOffSwitch)
    {
        onOffSwitch = "Off";
    }// End of setFlag

    public String getFlag()
    {
        return flag;
    }// End of getFlag

    public void setCh (int newChannel)
    {
        if (newChannel >= 99)
        {
            ch = 99;
        }else
        {
            ch = newChannel;
        }

        if(newChannel < 0)
        {
            ch = 0;
        }
    }//end of setCh

    public int getCh ()
    {
        return ch;
    }// End of getCh

    public void setVol(int newVolume)
    {
        if(newVolume >= 20)
        {
            vol = 20;
        }

        if(newVolume < 0)
        {
            vol=0;
        }
    }// End of SetVolume

    public void incrementVolume()
    {
        vol++;
    }

    public int getVol()
    {
        return vol;
    }// ENd of getVolume

    public String toString()
    {
        return String.format("%s :%s\n%s:%d\n%s :%d","TV is switched", flag,"TV channel",ch,"TV volume",vol);
    }

}// End of TV class

my test Drive class

import java.util.Scanner;

public class TvTest
{
    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        String tvStatus;
        int chan;
        int volu;

        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        TV tv2 = new TV("off",105,10);

        System.out.print(tv2);
        System.out.println();

        System.out.print("Turn TV On or Off ?");
        tvStatus = input.nextLine();

        System.out.print("Channel : ");
        chan = input.nextInt();

        System.out.print("Volume : ");
        volu = input.nextInt();

        TV tv1 = new TV(tvStatus,chan,volu);
        tv1.incrementVolume();

        System.out.println(tv1);
    }
}

and the test output

TV is switched :off
TV channel:105
TV volume :10
Turn TV On or Off ?on
Channel : 105
Volume : 1
TV is switched :on
TV channel:105
TV volume :2

why isnt my setters working ???

share|improve this question
1  
You haven't got any validation in the constructor. –  Sudhanshu Mar 18 '13 at 3:24
    
I don't understand the question. You aren't using your setters anywhere in the main program. –  scott.korin Mar 18 '13 at 3:26
    
Set flag = onOffSwitch . –  TGMCians Mar 18 '13 at 3:29
1  
In addition to the answers, flag ought to be a boolean not a String, and setFlag should take a boolean argument, etcetera. Your current code will happily accept "fish" as a flag value. –  Stephen C Mar 18 '13 at 3:35

5 Answers 5

Your constructor should be using your setters:

public TV(String onOffSwitch, int channel, int volume)
{
    this.setFlag(onOffSwitch);
    this.setCh(channel);
    this.setVol(volume);
}

setFlag should be setting flag to the value passed in.

public void setFlag(String onOffSwitch)
{
    this.flag = onOffSwitch;
}// End of setFlag
share|improve this answer
    
And, as Thilo noted, setVol needs to be fixed. –  scott.korin Mar 18 '13 at 4:15
public void setFlag(String onOffSwitch)
{
    onOffSwitch = "Off";
}// End of setFlag

onOffSwitch variable is not a field. That's the name in the parameter list, should be flag instead.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 The OP is overwriting the local variable. Always use this in setters, which should expose some nasty syntax errors like this. –  tjameson Mar 18 '13 at 3:30
 public void setVol(int newVolume)
    {
        if(newVolume >= 20)
        {
            vol = 20;
        }

        if(newVolume < 0)
        {
            vol=0;
        }
    }// End of SetVolume

That setter does not do anything unless the new value is out of range.

share|improve this answer

The problem isn't with your setters/getters (although they read a bit weird), the problem is, you're ignore them in your constructor...

public TV(String onOffSwitch, int channel, int volume)
{
    flag = onOffSwitch;
    ch = channel;
    vol = volume;
}

Try using something like

public TV(String onOffSwitch, int channel, int volume)
{
    setFlag(flag);
    setCh(channel);
    setVol(volume);
}

Instead...

The variable onOffSwitch is also undefined, so you example won't compile ;). It should read something like...

public void setFlag(String onOffSwitch)
{
    flag = onOffSwitch;
}// End of setFlag

Mind you, I'd probably use a boolean value and have turnOn and turnOff methods, but that's just me...

share|improve this answer

I've been drinking all day so keep this in mind but I'm guess you were too since you couldn't finish this basic assignment. : p

First off, never, ever, I mean ever use a String to represent a two state value. Booleans are nice, so use them.

class Televsion {
    power = false; # off
    power = true;  # on
}

Secondly, your variable names suck. Not to be mean, there is quite a bit of miss matched between them that needless complexes the program. Also don't use abbreviation or short hand variable names. I can understand if this was maybe 20 or 10 years ago, but modern editors tend have an auto completion features that help fill out the code in one or two key strokes.

It looks like you haven't learned about the keyword "this". When you use "this" inside a class, it specificity calls a specific variable or method from the class. The main takeaway is that it lets you avoid any name collisions from arguments and local variables.

class Televsion {
    private boolean power;
    private int channel;
    private int volume;

    public Televsion(  boolean power, int channel, int volume ) {
        this.power = power;
        this.channel= channel;
        this.volume = volume;
    }
}

This way it's a little more saner for the reader ;P

Testing code in a main method is for newbs and loser. JUnit is virtually built into Java now, so why not use it, or you can use TestNG ^.^

Building out a Test suite can make it easier to design and rework code.

You also might want to take a look at Hamcrest as well.

public TelevsionTest {
    private Televsion televsion;

    @Before
    public void boilerplateSetUpCode() {
        // The before annonation has it's roots in apsectJ, I beleve.
        // In this context it makes this method run before every test.

        televsion = new Televsion();
    }

    @Test
    public void testSwitchOn() {
        televsion.switchOn();
        assertTrue( televsion.getPowerState() == true ); 
        # JUnits assertions are weak, that's why I like hamcrest.
    }
}

Try to code for re-usability and maintainability. This can makes life easier in the long run, but a challenge in the shot term. What if you get cable or satellite, will this affect the channel numbers?

Here is a five minute hack on how I might rework the problem.

public class Televsion { private Logger4j logger;

private ChannelSource channelSource; // Naming is a little weak
private int volume;
private boolean power;

public Tv() {
    channelSource= channelSource.LOCAL;
    volume = 0;
    power = false;
}

public turnOn(){ power = true; }
public void turnOff() { power = false; }
public void muteVolume() { volume = 0; }
public void setVolume( volume ) {
    if ( volume > -1 && volume < 100 ) {
        this.volume = volume;
    } else {
        logger.dubug( String.format("Arg: %d", volume) );
        // This is anti-pattern of how not to word a debugging statement.
        // Plus, I'm lazy...
    }
}
public void changeChannelSource( ChannelSource channelSource ) {
    this.channelSource = channelSource;
}
public void changeChannelNumber( int channelNumber ) {
    channelSource.changeChannelNumber( channelNumber );
}

// I like singletons 
public enum ChannelSource {
    LOCAL(0), ALT(0), CABLE(0);

    private int channelNumber;

    private ChannelSource( int channelNumber ) {
        this.channelNumber = channelNumber ;
    }        


    public int getChannelNumber() { return channelNumber; }
    public void setChannelNumber( channelNumber ) {
        // Lazy hack
        if ( this.getName() == "LOCAL" ) {
            if ( channelNumber > -1 && channelNumber < 100 ) {
                this.channelNumber = channelNumber;
            } else {
                logger.debug( 
                    String.format("Unable to change %s, channel to %d", this.getName(), channelNumber) 
                );
            }
        }
    }
}

}

Hopefully, if you start improving your coding standards and start learning good programming techniques then you might enjoy coding enough to make an actual Stack Exchange account :)

This is a simple list of things you should learn to make your Java teacher happy.

- Unit Testing
   + Might as well let a computer grade the code then a human, free A's

- Data Structures
   + Just using collections good enough.  
   + Side rant, If use this style of matrices, Object[][] I will haunt you down.
      - It's inefficient, plus hard for people maintaining this shitty code
      - Jagged arrays can work just as well List< List<Object> > or you can even just use a single array, [] and sprinkle in some magic.

- Annotations
   + Helps takes the Java out of Java

- Read Effective Java
   + It's not a difficult book, will make life easier.

- Know a little about concurrency
   + If you use the synchronized keyword, then you know something is wrong.
   + Take a look into concurrent utils API
   + Read Java Concurrency in Practice

- Spring
   + If you want to get paid for knowing Java

I'm sure there are plenty of other things I'm leaving out but that's should be enough for anyone starting out learning Java.

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