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I was thinking a scenario like that :

class Utopia => A Base Class which pass it's fields and methods to derived classes.

class Watashi => A derived class, derived from Utopia and inherits everything

class Baka => A derived Class, Inherits some fields from Utopia

There are some types above and Type Baka should inherit some specific fields and methods but how ? How can I specify fields and methods that only Baka will inherits whereas Watashi inherits everything from Utopia.

Sample Code :

class Utopia {
   public string Moshi;

   [Exclude(ClassName("Baka"))]
   public string HaveIt;
}

class Baka : Utopia 
{
 // only Moshi appears here
 base.[Moshi]
}

class Watashi : Utopia 
{
  base.[Moshi][HaveIt];
}

If I want to use Polymorphism :

   Utopia _utopiaBaka = new Baka();
   _utop.[Moshi];

   Utopia _utopiaWatashi = new Watashi();
   _utopiaWatashi.[Moshi][HaveIt];

And of course Framework also checks the derived class whether they are base classes for other types.

share|improve this question

Split Utopia into more than one class. Have one class that any class can inherit from, so Baka would inherit from that.

Then, extend this PartialUtopia class, add the rest of the methods and have Watashi inherit from that.

This way you can have a way to have classes pick which methods they need by which base class they extend.

share|improve this answer
    
I am just thinking if we can use Attributes to achieve that ? – Tarik Oct 10 '09 at 3:50
2  
not possible, attributes can't change the compile time visibility of methods/properties. You could look at them with reflection and determine if that method would be allowed to be called or if it should be denied because it carries a certain attribute – TJF Oct 10 '09 at 3:54
2  
@James: There's a few AOP for C# out there. PostSharp and Aspect# spring to mind. – Cameron MacFarland Oct 10 '09 at 4:01
1  
@Aaron - In Java I can have a base class that has limited functionality, but everything inherits from. I also have interfaces, so Watashi inherits two interfaces, Baka inherits just one of the interfaces. I then inject my methods and properties into the two interfaces, so, anything that inherits the interface will get the appropriate methods. – James Black Oct 10 '09 at 4:08
1  
@Aaron - Java doesn't accept code in interfaces, but using AspectJ I can inject code into interfaces. It allows me to get around some of the limits of Java, and is a tangential style of programming to OOP. – James Black Oct 10 '09 at 4:22

Thats not how inheritance works in OOP. Baka inherits everything from Utopia just like Watashi.

share|improve this answer
    
I know but why not ? Maybe there is an attribute or something which I can specify which types will be excluded during inheritance. – Tarik Oct 10 '09 at 3:51
    
@Aaron: Doing so would break polymorphism. When a Baka is cast as a Utopia type, all the methods of Utopia need to be available. – Asaph Oct 10 '09 at 3:58
    
Because you would not have polymorphism which is a main goal or inheritance. – Aaron Fischer Oct 10 '09 at 3:59
    
Well, actually it also should prevent it from happening. When I cast Baka as Utopia Type, then the only methods,fields that Baka can inherit should be appeared. – Tarik Oct 10 '09 at 4:04
    
@Aaron: If you did that, your Baka cast as a Utopia would effectively be a broken instance of a Utopia because some of the methods wouldn't work. – Asaph Oct 10 '09 at 4:07

This is not how inheritance works, you would have to split up your classes. If you and your girlfriend get a child, you can't chose that it only inherits genes for blue eyes and a musculus body :)

share|improve this answer
    
Well, this is a computer world right ? :) – Tarik Oct 10 '09 at 3:55

I would suggest researching the differences between public, private, and protected. It sounds like that whats your looking for.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173149.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Well actually none of those keywords works for this situation. They don't filter them, just hide or allow. – Tarik Oct 10 '09 at 3:56
1  
Ah right. Good point. – Qiao Yi Oct 10 '09 at 4:02

What you want to do is completely incompatible with the concept of inheritance in Object Oriented programming. It is like asking "Why is blue blue?" if blue was not blue it would not be blue.

When one class (Baka) inherits from another (Utopia) this means (in OOP) that Baka can do everything that Utopia can - OOP languages offer features that rely upon this and if you were able to override you would cause horrible exceptions.

For example, if I have a method that takes a class of type Utopia as a paramter as below:

public void TakesUtopia(Utopia utopia)
{
    utopia.BePerfect();
}

We can also pass in classes of type Watashi and type Baka because they both inherit from Utopia. Baka, by inheriting from Utopia is guaranteed to have an implementation of the method BePerfect()

If somehow an instance of Baka did not have an implementation something horrible would happen.

To further this - consider what happens when TakesUtopia relies upon the behaviour of Utopia. Say for example utopia exposes a PriceOfHappiness property.

public string TakesUtopia(Utopia utopia)
{
     if (utopia.PriceOfHappiness() > 100)
     {
          return "Can't buy happiness';
     }
}

When writing my TakesUtopia method, should I be expected to write code to deal with the possiblity that any method within utopia is not implemented? What would such methods do when they are called?

share|improve this answer
    
Well, The thing that I can't understand why it would be against OOP logic. For example, it is something like a genetic engineer flags some genes to avoid them to be inherited to specific kids. It wouldn't go against the OOP nature ? – Tarik Oct 10 '09 at 4:15
    
And I don't believe it will ruin OOP logic too. – Tarik Oct 10 '09 at 4:17
    
How can my class that takes objects of type utopia function if it is able to receive objects that don't implement the members of utopia? What should I as a developer do in this world? Should I be expected to write code that deals with the case where someone decided to not inherit fully from a base class, for every single call I make to members of that base class? It would be entirely unworkable. – David Hall Oct 10 '09 at 4:22
    
What if I don't want to write the same codes that base type already have and don't want to see inherited fields in my derived type ? – Tarik Oct 10 '09 at 4:26
2  
Aaron, you are lacking a fundamental understanding of the Liskov Substitution Principle. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liskov_substitution_principle . Inheritance in OOP is not like genetic inheritence, it's more like cloning with adding additional things. If B inherits from A, then B IS AN A and B has all the functions, properties, and traits of A. This is why you can assign a B to an A reference and nothing goes wrong, because B is a complete superset of A. It is not (as in genetic inheritence) part A and part A2. – Erik Funkenbusch Oct 10 '09 at 4:39

What are you trying to do specifically? If you are concerned about a subclass overriding a given method implementation, you can always declare a method sealed:

class FooBase
{
    sealed void Bar()
    {
        //base implementation
    }
}

class FooDerived
{
    void Bar()  //poof! compilation error
    {
        //never reached
    }
}

Alternatively, you can have your inheriting subclass inside the assembly and the non-inherting outside. Just use protected internal.

share|improve this answer
    
But what about the other types that want to inherit Bar() ? – Tarik Oct 10 '09 at 4:31
    
@Aaron, I think you misunderstand... Bar() is still inherited in this situation. This just prevents the subclass from reimplementing it. – Ben Lakey Oct 10 '09 at 4:44
    
@Dxmio : so ? I mean it isn't what I wanted then :) I mean I don't want to re-implement or something, I basically don't want to see things that I don't want to be inherited. – Tarik Oct 10 '09 at 4:54
    
@Aaron Then I direct you to the other answers. What you want does not follow the OOP model. You would need to rethink your architecture. – Ben Lakey Oct 10 '09 at 21:48

There's two different concepts: interfaces and inheritance. Basically they're two different questions. One is "How do I want to interact with this object?" (interface). The second is "How does this object work internally?" (inheritance).

In classic OOP examples, consider a base class:

class Shape {
	virtual void draw();
	virtual int size();
}

This is an interface, it defines how you work with different shapes. Now consider these:

class Square : Shape {
	...
}

class Circle : Shape {
	...
}

While the interfaces to these two classes would be the same (draw() and size()), the implementations would not share anything in common. Is the drawing code for a circle really relevant at all to the drawing code for a Square? No, they just share the same name & desired result.

The reason I bring this up is because if you want some classes to inherit some members of other classes, then you may have the problem that you're confusing inheritance with interfaces. AFAIK, C++ doesn't support interfaces (I'm probably wrong about this). But you could fake this with 'pure virtual' classes (like the Shape above).

class Shape {
	virtual void draw();
}

class EdgyShape : Shape {
	virtual int width();
	virtual int height();
}

class RoundyShape : Shape {
	virtual int radius();
}

Now you have interfaces with a heirarchy, but no implementation at all.

class Circle : RoundyShape {
	...
}

class Rectangle : EdgyShape {
	...
}

class Square : Rectangle {
	...
}

So Circle and Rectangle share no code with each other, while Rectangle and Square do. And all 3 share the same basic Shape interface, with some additions depending on the type.

Maybe this sheds light on how to refactor your class heirarchy so you can split them up better?

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