Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking to alter the lzw compressor to enable it to search for a word in an LZW encoded file and finds the number of matches for that search term. For example if my file is used as

Prompt:>lzw "searchterm" encoded_file.lzw
32

Any suggestions on how to achive this?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define BITS 12                   /* Setting the number of bits to 12, 13*/
#define HASHING_SHIFT (BITS-8)    /* or 14 affects several constants.    */
#define MAX_VALUE (1 << BITS) - 1 /* Note that MS-DOS machines need to   */
#define MAX_CODE MAX_VALUE - 1    /* compile their code in large model if*/
                                  /* 14 bits are selected.               */
#if BITS == 16
  #define TABLE_SIZE 99991
#endif
#if BITS == 14
  #define TABLE_SIZE 18041        /* The string table size needs to be a */
#endif                            /* prime number that is somewhat larger*/
#if BITS == 13                    /* than 2**BITS.                       */
  #define TABLE_SIZE 9029
#endif
#if BITS <= 12
  #define TABLE_SIZE 5021
#endif

void *malloc();

int *code_value;                  /* This is the code value array        */
unsigned int *prefix_code;        /* This array holds the prefix codes   */
unsigned char *append_character;  /* This array holds the appended chars */
unsigned char decode_stack[4000]; /* This array holds the decoded string */

/*
 * Forward declarations
 */
void compress(FILE *input,FILE *output);
void expand(FILE *input,FILE *output);
int find_match(int hash_prefix,unsigned int hash_character);
void output_code(FILE *output,unsigned int code);
unsigned int input_code(FILE *input);
unsigned char *decode_string(unsigned char *buffer,unsigned int code);

/********************************************************************
**
** This program gets a file name from the command line.  It compresses the
** file, placing its output in a file named test.lzw.  It then expands
** test.lzw into test.out.  Test.out should then be an exact duplicate of
** the input file.
**
*************************************************************************/

main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
FILE *input_file;
FILE *output_file;
FILE *lzw_file;
char input_file_name[81];
char command;

command=(argv==3);

/*
**  The three buffers are needed for the compression phase.
*/
  code_value=(int*)malloc(TABLE_SIZE*sizeof(int));
  prefix_code=(unsigned int *)malloc(TABLE_SIZE*sizeof(unsigned int));
  append_character=(unsigned char *)malloc(TABLE_SIZE*sizeof(unsigned char));
  if (code_value==NULL || prefix_code==NULL || append_character==NULL)
  {
    printf("Fatal error allocating table space!\n");
    exit(-1);
  }
/*
** Get the file name, open it up, and open up the lzw output file.
*/
  if (argc>1)
    strcpy(input_file_name,argv[1]);
  else
  {
    printf("Input file name? ");
    scanf("%s",input_file_name);
  }
  input_file=fopen(input_file_name,"rb");
  lzw_file=fopen("test.lzw","wb");
  if (input_file==NULL || lzw_file==NULL)
  {
    printf("Fatal error opening files.\n");
    exit(-1);
  };
/*
** Compress the file.
*/
if(command=='r')
{
  compress(input_file,lzw_file);
}
  fclose(input_file);
  fclose(lzw_file);
  free(c-ode_value);
/*
** Now open the files for the expansion.
*/
  lzw_file=fopen("test.lzw","rb");
  output_file=fopen("test.out","wb");
  if (lzw_file==NULL || output_file==NULL)
  {
    printf("Fatal error opening files.\n");
    exit(-2);
  };
/*
** Expand the file.
*/
  expand(lzw_file,output_file);
  fclose(lzw_file);
  fclose(output_file);

  free(prefix_code);
  free(append_character);
}

/*
** This is the compression routine.  The code should be a fairly close
** match to the algorithm accompanying the article.
**
*/

void compress(FILE *input,FILE *output)
{
unsigned int next_code;
unsigned int character;
unsigned int string_code;
unsigned int index;
int i;

  next_code=256;              /* Next code is the next available string code*/
  for (i=0;i<TABLE_SIZE;i++)  /* Clear out the string table before starting */
    code_value[i]=-1;

  i=0;
  printf("Compressing...\n");
  string_code=getc(input);    /* Get the first code                         */
/*
** This is the main loop where it all happens.  This loop runs util all of
** the input has been exhausted.  Note that it stops adding codes to the
** table after all of the possible codes have been defined.
*/
  while ((character=getc(input)) != (unsigned)EOF)
  {
    if (++i==1000)                         /* Print a * every 1000    */
    {                                      /* input characters.  This */
      i=0;                                 /* is just a pacifier.     */
      printf("*");
    }
    index=find_match(string_code,character);/* See if the string is in */
    if (code_value[index] != -1)            /* the table.  If it is,   */
      string_code=code_value[index];        /* get the code value.  If */
    else                                    /* the string is not in the*/
    {                                       /* table, try to add it.   */
      if (next_code <= MAX_CODE)
      {
        code_value[index]=next_code++;
        prefix_code[index]=string_code;
        append_character[index]=character;
      }
      output_code(output,string_code);  /* When a string is found  */
      string_code=character;            /* that is not in the table*/
    }                                   /* I output the last string*/
  }                                     /* after adding the new one*/
/*
** End of the main loop.
*/
  output_code(output,string_code); /* Output the last code               */
  output_code(output,MAX_VALUE);   /* Output the end of buffer code      */
  output_code(output,0);           /* This code flushes the output buffer*/
  printf("\n");
}

/*
** This is the hashing routine.  It tries to find a match for the prefix+char
** string in the string table.  If it finds it, the index is returned.  If
** the string is not found, the first available index in the string table is
** returned instead.
*/

int find_match(int hash_prefix,unsigned int hash_character)
{
int index;
int offset;

  index = (hash_character << HASHING_SHIFT) ^ hash_prefix;
  if (index == 0)
    offset = 1;
  else
    offset = TABLE_SIZE - index;
  while (1)
  {
    if (code_value[index] == -1)
      return(index);
    if (prefix_code[index] == hash_prefix && 
        append_character[index] == hash_character)
      return(index);
    index -= offset;
    if (index < 0)
      index += TABLE_SIZE;
  }
}

/*
**  This is the expansion routine.  It takes an LZW format file, and expands
**  it to an output file.  The code here should be a fairly close match to
**  the algorithm in the accompanying article.
*/

void expand(FILE *input,FILE *output)
{
unsigned int next_code;
unsigned int new_code;
unsigned int old_code;
int character;
int counter;
unsigned char *string;

  next_code=256;           /* This is the next available code to define */
  counter=0;               /* Counter is used as a pacifier.            */
  printf("Expanding...\n");

  old_code=input_code(input);  /* Read in the first code, initialize the */
  character=old_code;          /* character variable, and send the first */
  putc(old_code,output);       /* code to the output file                */
/*
**  This is the main expansion loop.  It reads in characters from the LZW file
**  until it sees the special code used to inidicate the end of the data.
*/
  while ((new_code=input_code(input)) != (MAX_VALUE))
  {
    if (++counter==1000)   /* This section of code prints out     */
    {                      /* an asterisk every 1000 characters   */
      counter=0;           /* It is just a pacifier.              */
      printf("*");
    }
/*
** This code checks for the special STRING+CHARACTER+STRING+CHARACTER+STRING
** case which generates an undefined code.  It handles it by decoding
** the last code, and adding a single character to the end of the decode string.
*/
    if (new_code>=next_code)
    {
      *decode_stack=character;
      string=decode_string(decode_stack+1,old_code);
    }
/*
** Otherwise we do a straight decode of the new code.
*/
    else
      string=decode_string(decode_stack,new_code);
/*
** Now we output the decoded string in reverse order.
*/
    character=*string;
    while (string >= decode_stack)
      putc(*string--,output);
/*
** Finally, if possible, add a new code to the string table.
*/
    if (next_code <= MAX_CODE)
    {
      prefix_code[next_code]=old_code;
      append_character[next_code]=character;
      next_code++;
    }
    old_code=new_code;
  }
  printf("\n");
}

/*
** This routine simply decodes a string from the string table, storing
** it in a buffer.  The buffer can then be output in reverse order by
** the expansion program.
*/

unsigned char *decode_string(unsigned char *buffer,unsigned int code)
{
int i;

  i=0;
  while (code > 255)
  {
    *buffer++ = append_character/code/;
    code=prefix_code/code/;
    if (i++>=MAX_CODE)
    {
      printf("Fatal error during code expansion.\n");
      exit(-3);
    }
  }
  *buffer=code;
  return(buffer);
}

/*
** The following two routines are used to output variable length
** codes.  They are written strictly for clarity, and are not
** particularyl efficient.
*/

unsigned int input_code(FILE *input)
{
unsigned int return_value;
static int input_bit_count=0;
static unsigned long input_bit_buffer=0L;

  while (input_bit_count <= 24)
  {
    input_bit_buffer |= 
        (unsigned long) getc(input) << (24-input_bit_count);
    input_bit_count += 8;
  }
  return_value=input_bit_buffer >> (32-BITS);
  input_bit_buffer <<= BITS;
  input_bit_count -= BITS;
  return(return_value);
}

void output_code(FILE *output,unsigned int code)
{
static int output_bit_count=0;
static unsigned long output_bit_buffer=0L;

  output_bit_buffer |= (unsigned long) code << (32-BITS-output_bit_count);
  output_bit_count += BITS;
  while (output_bit_count >= 8)
  {
    putc(output_bit_buffer >> 24,output);
    output_bit_buffer <<= 8;
    output_bit_count -= 8;
  }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Here's a document on an algorithm to do regex searching directly in LZW compressed bytes :

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.9.1434&rep=rep1&type=pdf

It contains references to efficient algorithms to search for exact strings as well.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.