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I have this python code:

def sqrt(x):
    ans = 0
    if x >= 0:
    	while ans*ans < x:
    		ans = ans + 1
    		if ans*ans != x:
    			print x, 'is not a perfect square.'
    			return None
    		else:
    			print x, ' is a perfect square.'
    			return ans
    else:
    	print x, ' is not a positive number.'
    	return None

y = 16  	
sqrt(y)

the output is:

16 is not a perfect square.

Whereas this works perfectly:

x = 16
ans = 0
if x >= 0:
    while ans*ans < x:
    	ans = ans + 1
    	#print 'ans =', ans
    if ans*ans != x:
    	print x, 'is not a perfect square'	
    else: print ans, 'is a perfect square'
else: print x, 'is not a positive number'

What am I doing wrong?

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1  
Here is a related question on finding whether a number is a perfect square: stackoverflow.com/questions/295579/… –  Nick Craig-Wood Oct 10 '09 at 10:30

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Indent your code correctly to let the while statement execute until ans*ans < x:

def sqrt(x):
    ans = 0
    if x >= 0:
        while ans*ans < x:
            ans = ans + 1

        if ans*ans != x:  # this if statement was nested inside the while
            print x, 'is not a perfect square.'
            return None
        else:
            print x, ' is a perfect square.'
            return ans
    else:
        print x, ' is not a positive number.'
        return None

y = 16          
print sqrt(y)

Try it out here.

share|improve this answer
    
Aah! I was going crazy over this, indentation while really helps in reading the code can be really difficult to debug! :) –  Nimbuz Oct 10 '09 at 6:49
1  
Give me Python's indentation rules any day over the possibility my indentation may not match my braces in C et al. It's a lot easier if you make sure your editor is configured for spaces only. –  paxdiablo Oct 10 '09 at 7:04

Just thought I'd contribute a simpler solution:

def is_square(n):
    return sqrt(n).is_integer()

This is valid for n < 2**52 + 2**27 = 4503599761588224.

Examples:

>>> is_square(4)
True
>>> is_square(123)
False
>>> is_square(123123123432**2)
True
>>> is_square(123123123432**7)
True
>>> is_square(123123123432156156165**7)
True
>>> is_square(123456789123456789**7)
True

Hope this helps. =)

share|improve this answer
    
While a good answer for small values, this has precision problems. is_square(123456789123456789**7-1) gives True. There's no particularly easy solution, though. I don't think 123123123432156156165**7 is square anyway.. –  Veedrac May 26 at 7:17

Your while loop only executes once. No matter which branch the if statement inside it takes, the whole function will return immediately.

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Strange! The same code works outside the function, why is that? –  Nimbuz Oct 10 '09 at 6:23
    
Because the loop outside the function is not being exited prematurely with a return. –  paxdiablo Oct 10 '09 at 6:33

Change your code so it displays the value of ans as well as x, so you can tell how many times the loop is executed.

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ermm..can you please post the modified code? Thanks –  Nimbuz Oct 10 '09 at 6:26
    
I'm not a python programmer, but I could recognise the same problem as Greg Hewgill. –  pavium Oct 10 '09 at 6:27

If your code sample is actually correctly indentet the first round of the while will return on it's first round - always. So any positive value of x>1 will fullfil the ans*ans=1*1=1!=x, giving "x is not a perfect square".

You basically needs to get your indentation right - like you do in your other example. Again - if your code sample here actually is correctly indented. Try this:

def sqrt(x):
    ans = 0
    if x >= 0:
        while ans*ans < x:
            ans = ans + 1

        if ans*ans != x:
            print x, 'is not a perfect square.'
            return None
        else:
            print x, ' is a perfect square.'
            return ans
    else:
        print x, ' is not a positive number.'
        return None
share|improve this answer

EDIT I modified it, tried it out, and it works. You just need this piece of code

As soon as ans = 4, ans * ans is no longer smaller than x. Try while ans*ans <= x: instead of just <

def sqrt(x):
ans = 0
if x >= 0:
    	while ans*ans <= x:          	  		
            	if ans*ans == x:
                    		print x, ' is a perfect square.'
                    		return ans
		else:
			ans = ans + 1
share|improve this answer
    
Tried, still the same. –  Nimbuz Oct 10 '09 at 6:21
    
You can't return in your loop in the case where ans*ans is not x. def sqrt(x): ans = 0 if x >= 0: while ans*ans <= x: ans = ans + 1 if ans*ans == x: print x, ' is a perfect square.' return ans else: print x, ' is not a positive number.' return None print x, 'is not a perfect square.' return None y = 16 sqrt(y) –  ManicMailman Oct 10 '09 at 6:27
    
+ a print "not square" after the while to make it right.. –  stiank81 Oct 10 '09 at 6:41
    
I know, I was just taking a minimalist approach to make things more obvious –  ManicMailman Oct 10 '09 at 6:49
def isPerfectSquare(number):
    return len(str(math.sqrt(number)).split('.')[1]) == 1
share|improve this answer

If the goal is to determine whether a number is a perfect square, I would think it would be simpler (and perhaps more efficient) to use math builtins, e.g.:

def is_perfect_square(n):
  if not ( ( isinstance(n, int) or isinstance(n, long) ) and ( n >= 0 ) ):
    return False 
  else:
    return math.sqrt(n) == math.trunc(math.sqrt(n))
share|improve this answer
1  
This returns True for (2**64) - 1 -- you're losing precision –  bstpierre Apr 22 '11 at 13:45

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