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I have a decorator:

from functools import wraps
def d(f):
    @wraps(f)
    def wrapper(*args,**kwargs):
        print 'Calling func'
        return f(*args,**kwargs)
    return wrapper

And I want to prevent it from decorating the same function twice, e.g prevent things such as:

@d
@d
def f():
   print 2

Only possible solution I could think of is using a dict to store the functions the decorator has already decorated and raising an exception if asked to decorate a function that exists in the dict. Do tell if you have a better idea...

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1  
why would anybody write @d @d def f()? Shouldn't they be allowed to shoot themselves in the foot if they want to? :-) –  Lennart Regebro Oct 10 '09 at 6:48
    
Technically you're right :) But it won't be that simple - If one would make that mistake in half a year, and it will start generating odd results, e.g double printouts etc. they will come to me, and only after a few hours of banging my head against the wall I'll find the problem, probably. –  olamundo Oct 10 '09 at 6:53
    
Nah, you'd ask to see the code, and you'd see the double use fo the decorator directly. –  Lennart Regebro Oct 10 '09 at 7:38
1  
maybe the place to catch this type of problem is in your unittests –  John La Rooy Oct 10 '09 at 7:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd store the information in the function itself. There is a risk of a conflict if multiple decorators decide to use the same variable, but if it's only your own code, you should be able to avoid it.

def d(f):
    if getattr(f, '_decorated_with_d', False):
        raise SomeException('Already decorated')
    @wraps(f)
    def wrapper(*args,**kwargs):
        print 'Calling func'
        return f(*args,**kwargs)
    wrapper._decorated_with_d = True
    return wrapper

Another option can be this:

def d(f):
    decorated_with = getattr(f, '_decorated_with', set())
    if d in decorated_with:
        raise SomeException('Already decorated')
    @wraps(f)
    def wrapper(*args,**kwargs):
        print 'Calling func'
        return f(*args,**kwargs)
    decorated_with.add(d)
    wrapper._decorated_with = decorated_with
    return wrapper

This assumes that you control all the decorators used. If there is a decorator that doesn't copy the _decorated_with attribute, you will not know what is it decorated with.

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I was just thinking that, but i used hasattr(f,'_decorated_with_d') It won't work if there is another decorator in bewteen though –  John La Rooy Oct 10 '09 at 7:09
    
If you control all the decorators, you can use set _decorated_with, get it from the f function, add d to it, and store it back to the new wrapper. –  Lukáš Lalinský Oct 10 '09 at 7:12
    
Well we already know how to detect if there is any wrapper, so combine the two techniques and you can refuse to wrap a decorated function if it has no _decorated_with set on it –  John La Rooy Oct 10 '09 at 7:39

I'll also propose my solution:

first, create another decorator:

class DecorateOnce(object):
    def __init__(self,f):
        self.__f=f
        self.__called={} #save all functions that have been decorated 
    def __call__(self,toDecorate):
        #get the distinct func name
        funcName=toDecorate.__module__+toDecorate.func_name
        if funcName in self.__called:
            raise Exception('function already decorated by this decorator')
        self.__called[funcName]=1
        print funcName
        return self.__f(toDecorate)

Now every decorator you decorate with this decorator, will restrict itself to decorate a func only once:

@DecorateOnce
def decorate(f):
    def wrapper...
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You can store the function itself (f) in __called. Using names can always end up being a problem. –  Lukáš Lalinský Oct 10 '09 at 7:36
    
are you sure? I think the function's signature will be different once it's decorated the first time –  olamundo Oct 10 '09 at 7:55
    
Well, by f I mean the self.__f attribute in DecorateOnce, which is the decorator. –  Lukáš Lalinský Oct 10 '09 at 8:06

Noam, The property of func_code to use is co_name. See below, all that is changed is two lines at top of d()'s def

def d(f):
   if f.func_code.co_name == 'wrapper':
      return f    #ignore it  (or can throw exception instead...)
   @wraps(f)
   def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
      print 'calling func'
      return f(*args, **kwargs)
   return wrapper

Also, see for Lukáš Lalinský's approach which uses a explicitly defined property attached to the function object. This may be preferable as the "wrapper" name may be used elsewhere...

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Look at f.func_code, it can tell you if f is a function or a wrapper.

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1  
That's cool, but it will only tell me whether this function has been decorated before or not, but not whether it has been decorated with this specific decorator. –  olamundo Oct 10 '09 at 6:55
    
It will tell you it has been decorated before, but not which decorator –  John La Rooy Oct 10 '09 at 7:02

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