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int[] x = new int [] { 1, 2, 3};
int[] y = new int [] { 4, 5 };

int[] z = // your answer here...

Debug.Assert(z.SequenceEqual(new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 }));

--

Right now I use

int[] z = x.Concat(y).ToArray();

I'm wondering if there is an easier or more efficient method.

share|improve this question
5  
What do you mean by "efficient"? The code is short enough as it is, so I assume you mean efficient in terms of CPU/RAM? –  TToni Oct 10 '09 at 7:04
2  
No, a quick look with Reflector shows that it uses a double-when-full buffer –  erikkallen Oct 10 '09 at 10:24
    
Just be clear I need z to be a of type int[]. –  hwiechers Oct 11 '09 at 10:56
1  
I'm not really that concerned about efficiency. (I did say easier or more efficient.) I asked the question to check how other people were handling this common task. –  hwiechers Oct 11 '09 at 10:58

19 Answers 19

up vote 132 down vote accepted
var z = new int[x.Length + y.Length];
x.CopyTo(z, 0);
y.CopyTo(z, x.Length);
share|improve this answer
List<int> list = new List<int>();
list.AddRange(x);
list.AddRange(y);
int[] z = list.ToArray();

try that.

share|improve this answer
3  
Or even List<int> list = new List<int>(x); –  Matthew Scharley Oct 10 '09 at 7:04
2  
How is that more efficient than x.Concat(y)? It works and all, I'm just wondering if there is something that makes it better? –  Mike Two Oct 10 '09 at 7:07
5  
you might want to make the first line List<int> list = new List<int>(x.Length + y.Length); To avoid the resize that might happen as you call AddRange –  Mike Two Oct 10 '09 at 7:09
2  
@Mathew Scharley. The question is asking for a more efficient solution. I know the title makes it sound like any old combination will do but the full question goes beyond that. Reading some of the answers I just feel some people are answering the title. So I thought that this answer should probably mention efficiency if it deserves the upvotes since that seemed to be the point of the question. –  Mike Two Oct 10 '09 at 7:22
1  
@Matthew Actually I'm not talking about Array.Concat. I don't think there is one. I was thinking of the extension method in the Enumerable class. It actually just constructs an iterator that iterates over both arrays. So there are no copies or resizes with that approach. –  Mike Two Oct 10 '09 at 7:29

You could write an extension method:

public static T[] Concat<T>(this T[] x, T[] y)
{
    if (x == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("x");
    if (y == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("y");
    int oldLen = x.Length;
    Array.Resize<T>(ref x, x.Length + y.Length);
    Array.Copy(y, 0, x, oldLen, y.Length);
    return x;
}

Then:

int[] x = {1,2,3}, y = {4,5};
int[] z = x.Concat(y); // {1,2,3,4,5}
share|improve this answer
1  
Isn't there already an extension method that works on any IEnumerable? –  Mike Two Oct 10 '09 at 7:17
    
Yes, and I'd use that happily for most cases. But they have lots of overheads. It depends; 98% of the time the overheads are fine. If you are in the 2%, though, then some direct memcopy/array work is handy. –  Marc Gravell Oct 10 '09 at 7:21
    
+1 faster than CopyTo on array object. –  nawfal Nov 15 '12 at 14:01
1  
@nawfal, how is Copy faster than CopyTo? Care to elaborate? –  skrebbel Nov 23 '12 at 12:35
1  
@Shimmy It would not. Inside this method x is but a local variable, passing x as a ref to the resize method would create a new array and alter (the local variable) x to point to it. Or to rephrase: x passed into the resize and x inside the extension method is the same variable, but x is not passed into the extension method as a ref, so x is a different variable than the variable in the scope this extension was called from. –  AnorZaken Feb 5 at 20:34

Late to the party, but I had been checking on this same question and settled on a more general purpose solution that allows Concatenating an arbitrary set of 1 dimensional arrays of the same type. (I was concating 3+ at a time)

My function

    public static T[] ConcatArrays<T>(params T[][] list)
    {
        var result = new T[list.Sum(a => a.Length)];
        int offset = 0;
        for (int x = 0; x < list.Length; x++)
        {
            list[x].CopyTo(result, offset);
            offset += list[x].Length;
        }
        return result;
    }

and use

        int[] a = new int[] { 1, 2, 3 };
        int[] b = new int[] { 4, 5, 6 };
        int[] c = new int[] { 7, 8 };
        var y = ConcatArrays(a, b, c); //Results in int[] {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8} 
share|improve this answer
    
Liked the params T[][], never thought about passing arrays in as a params... –  Shimmy Feb 2 '12 at 1:57
    
Nice function, thanks! Changed params T[][] to this T[][] to make it an extension. –  Mark Oct 10 '12 at 19:14
    
The best solution, thanks! –  Spook Oct 31 '13 at 13:13

this is it:

using System.Linq;

int[] array1 = { 1, 3, 5 };
int[] array2 = { 0, 2, 4 };

// Concat array1 and array2.
var result1 = array1.Concat(array2);
share|improve this answer
1  
You mean int[] result = array1.ToList().Concat(array2.ToList()).toArray(); You cannot apply Concat on arrays directly I believe –  Michail Michailidis Oct 21 '14 at 19:57
    
The code correct, as arrays in C# implements the IEnumerable interface. (See 6th paragraph of Remarks section in the following documentation: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.array.aspx) –  Tormod Haugene Nov 4 '14 at 9:46
    
This solution -- z = x.Concat(y) -- is mentioned in the original question above. –  Jon Schneider Feb 20 at 19:32

You can take the ToArray() call off the end. Is there a reason you need it to be an array after the call to Concat?

Calling Concat creates an iterator over both arrays. It does not create a new array so you have not used more memory for a new array. When you call ToArray you actually do create a new array and take up the memory for the new array.

So if you just need to easily iterate over both then just call Concat.

share|improve this answer
public static T[] Concat<T>(this T[] first, params T[][] arrays)
{
    int length = first.Length;
    foreach (T[] array in arrays)
    {
        length += array.Length;
    }
    T[] result = new T[length];
    length = first.Length;
    Array.Copy(first, 0, result, 0, first.Length);
    foreach (T[] array in arrays)
    {
        Array.Copy(array, 0, result, length, array.Length);
        length += array.Length;
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
At StackOverflow please don't just paste code, but also explain your approach. In this specific case you may also have to explain what your late answer adds to the answers already given (and accepted) –  Gert Arnold Aug 6 '12 at 21:53
1  
Not sure what that "this" is doing before the first param, but for the rest, this is an excellent function. Generic, and with an infinite amount of parameters. –  Nyerguds Sep 24 '12 at 10:40
1  
Hi Nyerguds. To answer your question, the "this" keyword is used to make the function an extension method. For more information on extension methods check out this MSDN article –  JFish222 Jan 31 '13 at 2:29

You can do it the way you have referred to, or if you want to get really manual about it you can roll your own loop:

        string[] one = new string[] { "a", "b" };
        string[] two = new string[] { "c", "d" };
        string[] three;

        three = new string[one.Length + two.Length];

        int idx = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < one.Length; i++)
            three[idx++] = one[i];
        for (int j = 0; j < two.Length; j++)
            three[idx++] = two[j];
share|improve this answer
    
good thinking, but this is slower compared to Array.Copy –  nawfal Nov 23 '12 at 15:11
    
@nawfal I think that will depend on array size. This won my small array sized test. –  amalgamate Nov 14 '14 at 20:46

The most efficient structure in terms of RAM (and CPU) to hold the combined array would be a special class that implements IEnumerable (or if you wish even derives from Array) and links internally to the original arrays to read the values. AFAIK Concat does just that.

In your sample code you could omit the .ToArray() though, which would make it more efficient.

share|improve this answer

I know the OP was only mildly curious about performance. That larger arrays may get a different result (see @kurdishTree). And that it usually does not matter (@jordan.peoples). None the less, I was curious and therefore lost my mind ( as @TigerShark was explaining).... I mean that I wrote a simple test based on the original question.... and all the answers....

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace concat
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int[] x = new int [] { 1, 2, 3};
            int[] y = new int [] { 4, 5 };


            int itter = 50000;
            Console.WriteLine("test iterations: {0}", itter);

            DateTime startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for(int  i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] z;
                z = x.Concat(y).ToArray();
            }
            Console.WriteLine ("Concat Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks );

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for(int  i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                var vz = new int[x.Length + y.Length];
                x.CopyTo(vz, 0);
                y.CopyTo(vz, x.Length);
            }
            Console.WriteLine ("CopyTo Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks );

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for(int  i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                List<int> list = new List<int>();
                list.AddRange(x);
                list.AddRange(y);
                int[] z = list.ToArray();
            }
            Console.WriteLine("list.AddRange Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] z = Methods.Concat(x, y);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Concat(x, y) Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] z = Methods.ConcatArrays(x, y);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("ConcatArrays Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] z = Methods.SSConcat(x, y);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("SSConcat Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int k = 0; k < itter; k++)
            {
                int[] three = new int[x.Length + y.Length];

                int idx = 0;

                for (int i = 0; i < x.Length; i++)
                    three[idx++] = x[i];
                for (int j = 0; j < y.Length; j++)
                    three[idx++] = y[j];
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Roll your own Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);


            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] z = Methods.ConcatArraysLinq(x, y);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("ConcatArraysLinq Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] z = Methods.ConcatArraysLambda(x, y);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("ConcatArraysLambda Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                List<int> targetList = new List<int>(x);
                targetList.Concat(y);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("targetList.Concat(y) Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] result = x.ToList().Concat(y.ToList()).ToArray();
            }
            Console.WriteLine("x.ToList().Concat(y.ToList()).ToArray() Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);
        }
    }
    static class Methods
    {
        public static T[] Concat<T>(this T[] x, T[] y)
        {
            if (x == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("x");
            if (y == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("y");
            int oldLen = x.Length;
            Array.Resize<T>(ref x, x.Length + y.Length);
            Array.Copy(y, 0, x, oldLen, y.Length);
            return x;
        }

        public static T[] ConcatArrays<T>(params T[][] list)
        {
            var result = new T[list.Sum(a => a.Length)];
            int offset = 0;
            for (int x = 0; x < list.Length; x++)
            {
                list[x].CopyTo(result, offset);
                offset += list[x].Length;
            }
            return result;
        }


        public static T[] SSConcat<T>(this T[] first, params T[][] arrays)
        {
            int length = first.Length;
            foreach (T[] array in arrays)
            {
                length += array.Length;
            }
            T[] result = new T[length];
            length = first.Length;
            Array.Copy(first, 0, result, 0, first.Length);
            foreach (T[] array in arrays)
            {
                Array.Copy(array, 0, result, length, array.Length);
                length += array.Length;
            }
            return result;
        }

        public static T[] ConcatArraysLinq<T>(params T[][] arrays)
        {
            return (from array in arrays
                    from arr in array
                    select arr).ToArray();
        }

        public static T[] ConcatArraysLambda<T>(params T[][] arrays)
        {
            return arrays.SelectMany(array => array.Select(arr => arr)).ToArray();
        }
    }

}

The result was:

enter image description here

Roll your own wins.

share|improve this answer
    
In fairness to the methods that used methods, the Methods probably added roughly 10,000 ticks on my system. –  amalgamate Nov 14 '14 at 20:57

What you need to remember is that when using LINQ you are utilizing delayed execution. The other methods described here all work perfectly, but they are executed immediately. Furthermore the Concat() function is probably optimized in ways you can't do yourself (calls to internal API's, OS calls etc.). Anyway, unless you really need to try and optimize, you're currently on your path to "the root of all evil" ;)

share|improve this answer

Be carefull with the Concat method, the post Array Concatenation in C# explains that:

var z = x.Concat(y).ToArray();

Will be inefficient for large arrays. That means Concat method is only for meduim size arrays (up to 10000 elements).

share|improve this answer

I've found an elegant one line solution using LINQ or Lambda expression, both work the same (LINQ is converted to Lambda when program is compiled). The solution works for any array type and for any number of arrays.

Using LINQ:

public static T[] ConcatArraysLinq<T>(params T[][] arrays)
{
    return (from array in arrays
            from arr in array
            select arr).ToArray();
}

Using Lambda:

public static T[] ConcatArraysLambda<T>(params T[][] arrays)
{
    return arrays.SelectMany(array => array.Select(arr => arr)).ToArray();
}

I've provided both for one's preference. Performance wise @Sergey Shteyn's or @deepee1's solutions are a bit faster, Lambda expression being the slowest. Time taken is dependant on type(s) of array elements, but unless there are millions of calls, there is no significant difference between the methods.

share|improve this answer

Try the following:

T[] r1 = new T[size1];
T[] r2 = new T[size2];

List<T> targetList = new List<T>(r1);
targetList.Concat(r2);
T[] targetArray = targetList.ToArray();
share|improve this answer

For int[] what you've done looks good to me. astander's answer would also work well for List<int>.

share|improve this answer
2  
Concat would also work for List<int>. That's what is great about Concat, it works on any IEnumerable<> –  Mike Two Oct 10 '09 at 7:12

For smaller arrays <10000 elements:

using System.Linq;

int firstArray = {5,4,2};
int secondArray = {3,2,1};

int[] result = firstArray.ToList().Concat(secondArray.ToList()).toArray();
share|improve this answer

More efficient (faster) to use Buffer.BlockCopy over Array.CopyTo,

int[] x = new int [] { 1, 2, 3};
int[] y = new int [] { 4, 5 };

int[] z = new int[x.Length + y.Length];
var bytesInx = x.Length * sizeof(int);
Buffer.BlockCopy(x, 0, z, 0, bytesInx);
Buffer.BlockCopy(y, 0, z, bytesInx, y.Length * sizeof(int));
share|improve this answer
static class Extensions
{
    public static T[] Concat<T>(this T[] array1, params T[] array2)
    {
        return ConcatArray(array1, array2);
    }

    public static T[] ConcatArray<T>(params T[][] arrays)
    {
        int l, i;

        for (l = i = 0; i < arrays.Length; l += arrays[i].Length, i++);

        var a = new T[l];

        for (l = i = 0; i < arrays.Length; l += arrays[i].Length, i++)
            arrays[i].CopyTo(a, l);

        return a;
    }
}

I think the above solution is more general & lighter than the others I saw here. It is more general because it doesn't limit concatenation for only two arrays and is lighter because it doesn't use LINQ nor List.

Note the solution is concise and the added generality doesn't add significant runtime overhead.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd recommend trying to find newer questions or ones hat don't already have numerous answers - including one pretty much just like yours. –  Andrew Barber May 10 '14 at 1:19
    
I proposed this solution because I think it summarizes what is good from the other ones. It was crafted. –  drowa May 10 '14 at 5:50

I found this to be the simplest, given the arrays are identical, of course:

array3 = array1.Union(array2).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
1  
Union discards any duplicate items, so does not behave exactly as concatenation. –  Mert Jan 15 at 13:52

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