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I am getting the error: Using $this when not in object context for $this->filterArray

So I change this to self::filterArray and I get error: Unknown: Non-static method Abstract::filterArray() should not be called statically

I am not sure if I have this correct or if I should even be using an Abstract or Interface?

Basically what I am trying to do is setup an array(column_name => type) so that I can use it like this to build a basic insert with forced data type:

    $cols = SentDAO::describe();

    foreach ($cols as $col => $type) {

        if (!isset($data[$col])) continue;

        switch ($type) {
            case self::INT:      $value = intval($data[$col]);
            case self::TEXT:     $value = $this->escape($data[$col]);
            case self::DATE_NOW: $value = 'NOW()';
        }

        $return[] = " {$col} = '{$value}'";
    }

I didn't want to end up creating hundreds of different objects and wanted to keep it simple stored in an array.

/**
 * Abstract
 *
 */
abstract class AccountsAbstract
{
    /**
     * Data Types
     */
    const INT = "INT";
    const TEXT = "TEXT";
    const DATE_NOW = "DATE_NOW";

    /**
     * Get columns with data type
     * @param  array $filter: exclude columns
     * @return array
     */
    abstract static function describe($filter);

    /**
     * Filter from array, by unsetting element(s)
     * @param string/array $filter - match array key
     * @param array to be filtered
     * @return array
     */
    protected function filterArray($filter, $array)
    {
        if($filter === null) return $array;

        if(is_array($filter)){
            foreach($filter as $f){
                unset($array[$f]);
            }
        } else {
            unset($array[$filter]);
        }

        return $array;
    }
}


class AccountsDAO extends AccountsAbstract
{
    /**
     * Columns & Data Types.
     * @see AccountsAbstract::describe()
     */
    public static function describe($filter)
    {
        $cols = array(
            'account_id' => AccountsAbstract::INT,
            'key' => AccountsAbstract::TEXT,
            'config_id' => AccountsAbstract::INT
        );

        return $this->filterArray($cols, $filter);
    }
}

/**
 * Records
 */
class AccountsRecordsDAO extends AccountsAbstract
{
    public static function describe($filter)
    {
        $cols = array(
            'record_id' => AccountsAbstract::INT,
            'created' => AccountsAbstract::DATE_NOW,
            'customer_id' => AccountsAbstract::INT
        );

        return $this->filterArray($cols, $filter);
    }
}

/**
 * Config
 */
class AccountsConfigDAO extends AccountsAbstract
{
    public static function describe($filter)
    {
        $cols = array(
            'config_id' => AccountsAbstract::INT,
            'hidden' => AccountsAbstract::INT,
            'language_id' => AccountsAbstract::INT
        );

        return $this->filterArray($cols, $filter);
    }
}

Also I think using the full class name makes the code very messy and less portable: AccountsAbstract::INT, is there a way to use self::INT instead? Or should I create these as private properties even though they are never going to change only referenced.

share|improve this question
    
Sounds like you need to spend some time on understanding what instances are and what static means. –  Till Helge Mar 18 '13 at 8:51
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're calling filterArray from a static method, which means you have no $this instance.

As the implementation of filterArray doesn't seem to require $this, you could make this a static method too and call it via self::filterArray($filter, $array)

share|improve this answer
    
Thats fixed it thanks, is the rest of the logic correct? I mean do I need to be creating instances if all I need is an array? –  John Magnolia Mar 18 '13 at 8:58
    
I'm only really commenting on your syntax problems here. Your class structure would suggest you really wanted to make instantiable objects rather than collections of static methods, so you might want to review that. –  Paul Dixon Mar 18 '13 at 11:54
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