Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm porting some code from .Net to python.

At one point, we need to translate arbitrarily complex json from one format to another.

Eg:

{"Query": 
    {
        "Boolean": {
            "Operator": "And",
            "Parameters": [
                {"Equal": {"Name": "Bob"}},
                {"Boolean": ...}
            ]
        }
    }
}

To...

{"Query": 
    {
        "Left": {"Name":"Bob"},
        "Right": {...},
        "Operator": "And"
    }
}

We were using Json.Net's excellent Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConverter to hook into the serialisation / deserialisation process. We have 2 JsonConverters which convert from the same objects to/from each of these formats.

Public Overrides Function CanConvert(objectType As Type) As Boolean
    Return GetType(QueryDefinition).IsAssignableFrom(objectType)
End Function

This means we can pick out the bits we want to handle manually and allow the stock converter to do all the properties/values that we don't need to treat specially.

Is there any equivalent mechanism/framework in Python? or am I going to have to manually parse every property recursively?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can subclass the default JSONEncoder.

From: http://docs.python.org/2/library/json.html

"To use a custom JSONEncoder subclass (e.g. one that overrides the default() method to serialize additional types), specify it with the cls kwarg; otherwise JSONEncoder is used."

http://docs.python.org/2/library/json.html#json.JSONEncoder

Example of usage: Custom JSON encoder in Python 2.7 to insert plain JavaScript code

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Do you have an example of that in use? ... That was fast thanks. I'll accept when the timeout's up –  Basic Mar 18 '13 at 9:46
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.