Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've created a simple HttpModule and response stream to reformat the rendered output of web pages (see code snippets below).

In the HttpModule I set the Response.Filter to my PageStream:

m_Application.Context.Response.Filter = new PageStream(m_Application.Context);

In the PageStream I overwrite the Write method in order to do my reformatting of the rendered output:

public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
{
    string html = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(buffer);
    //Do some string resplace operations here...
    byte[] input = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(html);
    m_DefaultStream.Write(input, 0, input.Length);
}

And this work fine when using it on simple HTML pages (.html), but when I use this method on ASPX pages (.aspx), the Write method is called several times, splitting up the reformatting into different steps, and potentially destroying the string replacement operations.

How do I solve this? Is there a way to let the ASPX page NOT call Write several times, e.g. by changing its buffer size, or have I chosen the wrong approach entirely, by using this Response.Filter method to manipulate the rendered output?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers 4

I would just buffer the data in the Write method, and do the string operations in the Close method, like this:

private readonly Stream _forwardStream;
private readonly StringBuilder _sb;

// snip

public override void Write (byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
{
  string chunk = Encoding.UTF8.GetString (buffer, offset, count);
  _sb.Append (chunk);
}

public override void Close ()
{
  string result = GetManipulatedString ();

  byte[] rawResult = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes (result);
  _forwardStream.Write (rawResult, 0, rawResult.Length);

  base.Close ();
  _forwardStream.Close ();
}

(Maybe even better if you collect the data in a MemoryStream)

share|improve this answer
add comment

You might need to check the content type before attaching the response filter:

var response = m_Application.Context.Response;
if (response.ContentType == "text/html")
{
    response.Filter = new PageStream(m_Application.Context);
}

There's also a nice article describing response filters in ASP.NET.

share|improve this answer
    
Although your answer didn't make any sense in relation to my question, I naturally check for the content type before setting the Response.Filter, the supplied article did help me out. Thanks. –  PropellerHead Oct 10 '09 at 10:28
add comment
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Guided by the article suggested by Darin Dimitrov, I ended with the following implementation of the Write method that also works perfectly with ASPX pages:

public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
{
    string strBuffer = System.Text.UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetString (buffer, offset, count);

    if (!strBuffer.Contains("</html>"))
    {
        m_ResponseHtml.Append(strBuffer);
    }
    else
    {
        m_ResponseHtml.Append(strBuffer);
        string  html = m_ResponseHtml.ToString ();

        //Do some string operations here...
        byte[] input = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(html);
        m_DefaultStream.Write(input, 0, input.Length);           
    }
}

The code leverages a StringBuilder (m_ResponseHtml) to accumulate the entire HTML, before doing the actual string manupulation on the rendered output.

share|improve this answer
add comment

PropellerHead's response relies on finding the closing html tag in the final buffer, but I actually had the final buffer be too small to contain the entire tag.

A safer (and more efficient as well) method is to only do the append in Write and to then do the string operations and output in Close.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.