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So what I'm doing is reading a lot of data from remote Nettezza database and inserting them into another remote Oracle database. For that I'm using ODBC driver. The problem is that there is a lot of data and it takes too much time. How can I speed up? Here is what I do:

First I create connection and command for inserting:

String connect = "Driver={Microsoft ODBC for Oracle};CONNECTSTRING=(DESCRIPTION=(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(HOST=myhost)(PORT=myprt))(CONNECT_DATA=(SERVICE_NAME=myname)));Uid=uid;Pwd=pass";
        connection = new OdbcConnection(connect);
        connection.Open();
        String q = @"INSERT INTO TEST (id)
        VALUES (?)";
        myCommand = new OdbcCommand(q,connection);

Then I read data from netteza:

 String connect = "Driver={NetezzaSQL};servername=server;port=5480;database=db; username=user;password=pass;
        string query = @"SELECT T2.LETO_MESEC, T1.* 
                        FROM data T1 
                        JOIN datga2 T2 ON T2.ID = T1.EFT_ID 
                        WHERE T2.LETO_MESEC = '" + mesec + @"'";
            using (OdbcConnection connection = new OdbcConnection(connect))
            {
                try
                {
                    OdbcCommand command = new OdbcCommand(query, connection);
                    connection.Open();
                    OdbcDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader();
                    int counter=0;
                    while (reader.Read())
                    {
                        int id_first = reader.GetInt32(5);

                        insertOracle(id_first);
                    }
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("ne dela" + e.ToString());
                }
            }

And finally my insert :

 public void insertOracle(int id_first)
    {

            try
            {
                myCommand.Parameters.Clear();
                myCommand.Parameters.Add(new OdbcParameter("id", id_first));
                myCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("ne dela" + e.ToString());
            }

    }

I noticed that these commit in every line, so how to remove that and speed it up. Right now it takes about 10 minutes for 20000 rows.

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1  
instead of executing each insert query separately, you can create a batch of insert queries for example (100) (separated by ;) and then insert them using a single ExectuteNonQuery, you can keep all of them in a transaction if you like. – Habib Mar 18 '13 at 10:19
    
+1 for BEGIN TRANSACTION, [do your inserts], COMMIT TRANSACTION – Gord Thompson Mar 18 '13 at 10:20
    
Can somebody please post example on how to do it??? – gabrjan Mar 18 '13 at 10:20
1  
Are you doing single selects/inserts? Then you are suffering from the context changes. Your application has to switch from your source database to the target database for each row you are transfering. This is costly. If both databases are at different physical locations, this problem is worsened by the network latency. Try batch selecting/inserting. In Oracle, a batch insert can be done with forall. – Thomas Tschernich Mar 18 '13 at 10:22
    
Ok now i'm commiting every 10.000 rows and execution time for 20.000 is steel around 10 minuts ... – gabrjan Mar 18 '13 at 10:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Single inserts are always going to be slow -- start processing the data in arrays, selecting a batch of ID's from the source system and loading an array to the target.

Here is an article which might be helpful. http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/issue-archive/2009/09-sep/o59odpnet-085168.html

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