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I started using R about six months back and i have gained a little bit of experience in R. Recently, I ran into an issue regarding subsets within a matrix and would like assistance on making the solution that I have more efficient.

What I would like to do is the following. Suppose I have a matrix and two vectors as follows:

# matrix
a <- matrix(seq(1,100,by=1),10,10)
# vector (first column of matrix a)
b <- c(2,4,5,6,7,8)
# vector (column numbers of matrix a)
c <- c(5,3,1,4,6,2)

Just to reiterate,

  • Vector b refers to the first column of matrix a.
  • Vector c refers to column numbers of matrix a.

I would like to get tmp99 <- a[b,c:8]. However, when I do that I get the following warning message.

Warning message:
In c:8 : numerical expression has 6 elements: only the 
        first used (index has to be scalar and not vector)

So, I tried working around the problem using loops and list and I get the solution I want. I am assuming that there is a more time efficient solution than this. The solution what I have so far is the following:

a <- matrix(seq(1,100,by=1),10,10)
b <- c(2,4,5,6,7,8)
c <- c(5,3,1,4,6,2)
tmp <- list()
for (i in 1:length(b)) tmp[[i]] <- c(a[b[i],(c[i]:8)])
tmp99 <- t(sapply(tmp, '[', 1:max(sapply(tmp, length))))
tmp99[is.na(tmp99)] <- 0

What I would like to know is if there is a way to avoid using loops to achieve the above because my matrix dimension is 200000 x 200 and since I have to do this a lot (In my problem, b and c are determined as part of another part of the code and so I am not able to use absolute index numbers), I would like to cut down the time taken for the same. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

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Why is this tagged with html and only that? –  CBroe Mar 18 '13 at 11:04
    
As general good practice you probably want to avoid calling variables by function names (like c) –  ds440 Mar 18 '13 at 15:09

3 Answers 3

You might try some kind of matrix indexing solution, like this. It's not clear if it will actually be faster or not; in small cases, I think it definitely will be, but in big cases, the overhead from creating the matrixes to index by might take longer than just running through a for loop. To get a better answer, make up a data set that is similar to yours that we could test against.

idx.in <- cbind(rep(b, 8-c+1), unlist(lapply(c, function(x) x:8)))
idx.out <- cbind(rep(seq_along(b), 8-c+1), unlist(lapply(c, function(x) 1:(8-x+1))))
tmp99 <- array(0, dim=apply(idx.out, 2, max))
tmp99[idx.out] <- a[idx.in]

Here's a version with matrix indexing but that does it separately for each row. This might be faster, depending on how many rows and columns are being replaced. What you want to avoid is running out of memory, which the for loop can help with, as it doesn't keep all the details for each step in memory at the same time.

out <- array(0, dim=c(length(b), 8-min(c)+1))
for(idx in seq_along(b)) {
  out[cbind(idx, 1:(8-c[idx]+1))] <- a[cbind(b[idx], c[idx]:8)]
}
out
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot Aaron, @geektrader , Roland and Arun for showing me ways to potentially speed-up the solution. I tried 3 out of the 4 approaches (Have not tried Arun's approach yet) and they turn out to be slower and/or requiring more memory than the current 'for loop' solution is. Just for completeness, I have 16GB RAM i7 system. Meanwhile, I am going to try and makeup a dataset, like Aaron suggested, and post the same and see if that helps. Thank you all for taking the time to provide help for me. I have definitely learned different ways of approaching this problem. –  Ram Mar 19 '13 at 8:10

Following is one way to do it using base packages. There might be better solution using data.table but following works :)

a <- matrix(seq(1, 100, by = 1), 10, 10)
b <- c(2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)
c <- c(5, 3, 1, 4, 6, 2)

res <- t(sapply(X = mapply(FUN = function(b, c) expand.grid(b, seq(from = c, to = 8)), b, c, SIMPLIFY = FALSE), FUN = function(x) {
    c(a[as.matrix(x)], rep(0, 8 - nrow(x)))
}))

res
##      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8]
## [1,]   42   52   62   72    0    0    0    0
## [2,]   24   34   44   54   64   74    0    0
## [3,]    5   15   25   35   45   55   65   75
## [4,]   36   46   56   66   76    0    0    0
## [5,]   57   67   77    0    0    0    0    0
## [6,]   18   28   38   48   58   68   78    0



# Let's break it down in multiple steps.

coordinates <- mapply(FUN = function(b, c) expand.grid(b, seq(from = c, to = 8)), b, c, SIMPLIFY = FALSE)

# below sapply subsets c using each element in coordinates and pads result with additional 0s such that total 8 elements are returned.

res <- sapply(X = coordinates, FUN = function(x) {
    c(a[as.matrix(x)], rep(0, 8 - nrow(x)))
})
res
##      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
## [1,]   42   24    5   36   57   18
## [2,]   52   34   15   46   67   28
## [3,]   62   44   25   56   77   38
## [4,]   72   54   35   66    0   48
## [5,]    0   64   45   76    0   58
## [6,]    0   74   55    0    0   68
## [7,]    0    0   65    0    0   78
## [8,]    0    0   75    0    0    0


# you probably need result as traspose
res <- t(res)

res
##      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8]
## [1,]   42   52   62   72    0    0    0    0
## [2,]   24   34   44   54   64   74    0    0
## [3,]    5   15   25   35   45   55   65   75
## [4,]   36   46   56   66   76    0    0    0
## [5,]   57   67   77    0    0    0    0    0
## [6,]   18   28   38   48   58   68   78    0
share|improve this answer
tmp <- lapply(seq_len(length(b)),function(i) {
  res <- a[b[i],c[i]:8]
  res <- c(res,rep(0,c[i]-1))
  res
                                              })
tmp99 <- do.call("rbind",tmp)
#       [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8]
# [1,]   42   52   62   72    0    0    0    0
# [2,]   24   34   44   54   64   74    0    0
# [3,]    5   15   25   35   45   55   65   75
# [4,]   36   46   56   66   76    0    0    0
# [5,]   57   67   77    0    0    0    0    0
# [6,]   18   28   38   48   58   68   78    0
share|improve this answer

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