Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Whilst I've seen similar looking questions asked before, the accepted answers have seemingly provided an answer to a different question (IMO).

I have just joined a company and before I make any changes/fixes, I want to ensure that all the tests pass. I've fixed all but one, which I've discovered is due to some (to me) unexpected behavior in Java. If I insert a key/value pair into a Properties object where the value is an int, I expected autoboxing to come into play and getProperty would return a string. However, that's not what's occuring (JDK1.6) - I get a null. I have written a test class below:

import java.util.*;

public class hacking
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Properties p = new Properties();
        p.put("key 1", 1);
        p.put("key 2", "1");

        String s;

        s = p.getProperty("key 1");
        System.err.println("First key: " + s);

        s = p.getProperty("key 2");
        System.err.println("Second key: " + s);
    }
}

And the output of this is:

C:\Development\hacking>java hacking
First key: null
Second key: 1

Looking in the Properties source code, I see this:

public String getProperty(String key) {
    Object oval = super.get(key);
    String sval = (oval instanceof String) ? (String)oval : null;
    return ((sval == null) && (defaults != null)) ? defaults.getProperty(key) : sval;
}

The offending line is the second line - if it's not a String, it uses null. I can't see any reason why this behavior would be desired/expected. The code was written by almost certainly someone more capable than I am, so I assume there is a good reason for it. Could anyone explain? If I've done something dumb, save time and just tell me that! :-)

Many thanks

share|improve this question
8  
Fundamentally you should only use Properties for String to String mappings. The fact that it extends Hashtable should be seen as an unfortunate implementation detail :( – Jon Skeet Mar 18 '13 at 10:57
1  
I think is because properties was design to hold only strings but because the implementation is extending Hashtable is allowing you to add an object (class Properties extends Hashtable<Object,Object>). In case you are using only setProperty(String key, String value) you won't get into that situation – user1121883 Mar 18 '13 at 11:02
    
Thanks, glad I've not been dumb in a public arena. Personally I think that tho the data is stored in the hashtable ok, if it's going to effectively corrupt that data it should be made very apparent. I can work around it without too much trouble. – Amadeus1756 Mar 18 '13 at 11:22
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is form docs: "Because Properties inherits from Hashtable, the put and putAll methods can be applied to a Properties object. Their use is strongly discouraged as they allow the caller to insert entries whose keys or values are not Strings. The setProperty method should be used instead. If the store or save method is called on a "compromised" Properties object that contains a non-String key or value, the call will fail. Similarly, the call to the propertyNames or list method will fail if it is called on a "compromised" Properties object that contains a non-String key."

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, great info. – Amadeus1756 Mar 18 '13 at 11:23

I modified your code to use the setProperty method as per the docs and it brings up compilation error

package com.stackoverflow.framework;
import java.util.*;

public class hacking
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Properties p = new Properties();
        p.setProperty("key 1", 1);
        p.setProperty("key 2", "1");

        String s;

        s = p.getProperty("key 1");
        System.err.println("First key: " + s);

        s = p.getProperty("key 2");
        System.err.println("Second key: " + s);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Joe, just did the same and (surprisingly enough) just found the same! :-) – Amadeus1756 Mar 18 '13 at 11:20
    
If you are using properties.put(), then you have to use properties.get(). You cannot use properties.put and properties.getProperty. That was the mistake you did. Put and get are the methods of hashtable, while setProperty and getproperty are the attributes of Property – Joe2013 Mar 18 '13 at 12:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.