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I am searching for a RegEx for prices. So it should be X numbers in front, than a "," and at the end 2 numbers max.

Can someone support me and post it please?

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There are currencies out there that need 3 decimal digits, even the USD and the EUR need 3 decimal digits in some scenarios. –  Alix Axel Aug 11 '12 at 9:00
1  
@AlixAxel When do USD and EUR need three digits after the comma? –  Tim Apr 23 '13 at 8:26
    
@TimN: AFAIK, all EU countries must calculate the gas prices with a 3 digit precision. Another example: Forex exchange rates (5 decimal places I believe). –  Alix Axel Apr 23 '13 at 8:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In what language are you going to use it?

It should be something like:

^\d+(,\d{1,2})?$

Explaination:

X number in front is: ^\d+ where ^ means the start of the string, \d means a digit and + means one or more

We use group () with a question mark, a ? means: match what is inside the group one or no times.

inside the group there is ,\d{1,2}, the , is the comma you wrote, \d is still a digit {1,2} means match the previous digit one or two times.

The final $ matches the end of the string.

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^\d+,\d{1,2}$
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yours is better. I'm trying to get optional decimals –  Stefano Borini Oct 10 '09 at 10:26

So I ran into a similar problem, needing to validate if an arbitrary string is a price, but needed a lot more resilience than the regexes provided in this thread and many other threads.

I needed a regex that would match all of the following:

  • 5
  • 5.00
  • 1,000
  • 1,000,000.99
  • 5,99 (european price)
  • 5.999,99 (european price)
  • 0.11
  • 0.00

And not to match stuff like IP addresses. I couldn't figure out a single regex to deal with the european and non-european stuff in one fell swoop so I wrote a little bit of Ruby code to normalise prices:

if value =~ /^([1-9][0-9]{,2}(,[0-9]{3})*|[0-9]+)(\.[0-9]{1,9})?$/
  Float(value.delete(","))
elsif value =~ /^([1-9][0-9]{,2}(\.[0-9]{3})*|[0-9]+)(,[0-9]{1,9})?$/
  Float(value.delete(".").gsub(",", "."))
else
  false
end

The only difference between the two regexes is the swapped decimal place and comma. I'll try and break down what this is doing:

/^([1-9][0-9]{,2}(,[0-9]{3})*|[0-9]+)(\.[0-9]{1,9})?$/

The first part:

([1-9][0-9]{,2}(,[0-9]{3})*

This is a statement of numbers that follow this form: 1,000 1,000,000 100 12. But it does not allow leading zeroes. It's for the properly formatted numbers that have groups of 3 numerics separated by the thousands separator.

Second part:

[0-9]+

Just match any number 1 or more times. You could make this 0 or more times if you want to match: .11 .34 .00 etc.

The last part:

(\.[0-9]{1,9})?

This is the decimal place bit. Why up to 9 numerics, you ask? I've seen it happen. This regex is supposed to be able to handle any weird and wonderful price it sees and I've seen some retailers use up to 9 decimal places in prices. Usually all 0s, but we wouldn't want to miss out on the data ^_^

Hopefully this helps the next person to come along needing to process arbitrarily badly formatted price strings or either european or non-european format :)

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@Bart I got it totally wrong. I was trying to match prices like 10,256,543.45 (but failed).

OP wanted just 10256543,45

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Nope, that would match strings like: ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, and 0,0,0,0,0,0,0 –  Bart Kiers Oct 10 '09 at 10:32
    
Oops, I was trying to match strings like 10,256,543.45 (but failed). regex is not my cup of tea. –  Amarghosh Oct 10 '09 at 10:45
    
No problem. FYI, a regex for such numbers would be: \d{1,3}(,\d{3})*\.\d{1,2} –  Bart Kiers Oct 10 '09 at 10:53
    
Thanks, I was struggling with that. Now I fully understand the meaning of "now you have two problems" joke on regex :) –  Amarghosh Oct 10 '09 at 12:00
    
@Bart I tried to modify that regex, met with a roadblock and posted it as a question here stackoverflow.com/questions/1565994 –  Amarghosh Oct 14 '09 at 12:43

anything like \d+,\d{2} is wrong because the \d matches [0-9\.] i.e. 12.34,1.

should be: [0-9]+,[0-9]{2} (or [0-9]+,[0-9]{1,2} to allow only 1 decimal place)

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No, \d does not match a '.', it is the same as [0-9] –  Bart Kiers Oct 10 '09 at 11:02
    
Wrong. \d is short for [0-9] regular-expressions.info/charclass.html –  Amarghosh Oct 10 '09 at 11:03
    
@Amarghosh That isn't true, either. It matches several additional unicode characters. –  Tim Apr 25 '13 at 6:30

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