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What do those functions check?

From what I understand, they are supposed to check if a word contains a non-alphanumeric character. I don't understand how it does this.

My understanding:

  • The first check is for the length - this is OK.
  • The second check is if the character is a letter:
  • IsLetter(symbol[0])) evaluates to FALSE. This is logically negated.
  • The third function is the same as the above.

What I didn't understand, is the fourth one: IsLetterOrDigit(*symbol)).

How does it check if the word has non-alphanumeric characters?

The code:

int IsSymbolValid(char* symbol)
{
    int len = strlen(symbol);

    if ((len == 0) || (len > MAX_SYMBOL_SIZE))
    {
        strcpy(LastParsingError, "Invalid symbol length");
        return 0;
    }

    if (!IsLetter(symbol[0]))
    {
        strcpy(LastParsingError, "Symbol name has to start with letter");
        return 0;
    }

    while (*symbol != 0)
    {
        if (IsLetterOrDigit(*symbol))
        {
            strcpy(LastParsingError, "Symbol name can contain only letters and digits");
            return 0;
        }
        ++symbol;
    }

    return 1;
}

int IsLetter(char ch)
{
    return (((ch >= 'a') && (ch <= 'z')) || ((ch >= 'A') && (ch <= 'Z')));
}

int IsDigit(char ch)
{
    return ((ch >= '0') && (ch <= '9'));
}

int IsLetterOrDigit(char ch)
{
    return (IsLetter(ch) && IsDigit(ch));
}
share|improve this question
    
Note the loop around the call to IsLetterOrDigit. –  Philip Kendall Mar 18 '13 at 11:56
1  
Why are you unportably reinventing isalpha, isalnum and isdigit? –  Seb Mar 18 '13 at 11:58
1  
Who on Earth writes his own functions instead of using isdigit() or isalpha() from <ctype.h>? –  user529758 Mar 18 '13 at 11:59
    
@H2CO3, a beginner? –  Shahbaz Mar 18 '13 at 12:00
    
@Shahbaz: Your answer is invalid. Do you see beginners rewriting strcpy more often than not? –  Seb Mar 18 '13 at 12:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your confusion comes from the fact that this function is indeed wrong:

int IsLetterOrDigit(char ch)
{
    return (IsLetter(ch) && IsDigit(ch));
}

&& shows logical and, while a character cannot be both a digit and a letter. It should have used || (logical or):

int IsLetterOrDigit(char ch)
{
    return (IsLetter(ch) || IsDigit(ch));
}

While we are at it, it seems like there is also a bug where it is being used:

if (IsLetterOrDigit(*symbol))
{
    strcpy(LastParsingError, "Symbol name can contain only letters and digits");
    return 0;
}

You'd want the error if the characters is not letter or digit. Therefore (notice the !):

if (!IsLetterOrDigit(*symbol))
{
    strcpy(LastParsingError, "Symbol name can contain only letters and digits");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
while (*symbol != 0) { if (!IsLetterOrDigit(*symbol)) { strcpy(LastParsingError, "Symbol name can contain only letters and digits"); return 0; } int IsLetterOrDigit(char ch) { return (IsLetter(ch) && IsDigit(ch)); } so if i write this way the strcpy will be activated only if the char is not a ABC and not a number. right? –  Yuval Mar 18 '13 at 12:10
    
@Yuval, No, you completely ignored my first fix. Also, take a look at the Demorgan's law, it's good for your understanding. –  Shahbaz Mar 18 '13 at 12:14
    
i know that it cant be also digit and number, this is why it can never return 1, but it can return 0 if they are both not numbers and not chars. if you put the || it will always return 1. no? –  Yuval Mar 18 '13 at 12:32
    
If it is both not a number and not a character, then || will return 0, because 0 || 0 = 0. There's demorgan's law right in my last sentence: not a number and not a character = not (a number or a character). –  Shahbaz Mar 18 '13 at 13:15

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