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I am sending data from a windows form to web service in the form of ArrayList. In web service declaration of my method is like:

[WebMethod]
public int SaveSelectedOffers(ArrayList offers, int selectedRows)
{

}

and in windows form, on the button click, my code is:

private void offersAvailableSubmit_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    ArrayList options;
    options.Add("item 1");
    options.Add("item 2");
    options.Add("item 2");
    //In this line of code it is showing error that Argument 1: cannot convert from 'System.Collections.ArrayList' to 'object[]'
    int rowsAffected = serviceCaller.SaveSelectedOffers(options, rowCount); 
}
  1. Datatype of options is ArrayList and in web service also I am using ArrayList type of variable to hold this value, then why this error occur?

  2. Is it proper way to send parameter to web service or there is an other way for this?

share|improve this question
    
In your code ArrayList options; should be like ArrayList options=new ArrayList(); – Satpal Mar 18 '13 at 12:01
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Web services can't pass complex types like ArrayList, or at least not without some configuration, so just simplify your web service. Change it to this:

public int SaveSelectedOffers(object[] offers, int selectedRows)

which is how it's being generated anyway as you can see, and then call it like this:

private void offersAvailableSubmit_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    object[] options = new object[3];
    options[0] = "item 1";
    options[1] = "item 2";
    options[2] = "item 2";

    int rowsAffected = serviceCaller.SaveSelectedOffers(options, rowCount); 
}

Another option for the initialization of options, if you're looking for something more concise, would be like this:

object[] options = new object[] { "item 1", "item 2", "item 3" };
share|improve this answer
2  
Very simple configuration: by going in to the config page and selecting the generic list type means a world of pleasure compared to 'dumbing down' like this. – Grant Thomas Mar 18 '13 at 12:00
1  
@GrantThomas, as true as that is, doesn't it seem much more practical to leverage primitive types so that other platforms are much more capable of accessing your services? I guess I think this way because in my organization we have MF, Java, .NET, C++, PHP, Perl, and any other platform you can think of operating across organizational sections. – Mike Perrenoud Mar 18 '13 at 12:02
    
You're not the only one to 'think this way', but you misunderstand me. Such a configuration doesn't prevent non-.NET clients one bit: it's a client configuration. A case where a bit of knowledge compounds ideas & progress. – Grant Thomas Mar 18 '13 at 12:03
    
@GrantThomas, so you're stating that server-side WCF will manage the deserialization and then client-side I could use an ArrayList in a .NET platform and an object[] in Java? I mean, the ArrayList would almost certainly have to actually be serialized to an object[] yes? – Mike Perrenoud Mar 18 '13 at 12:12
    
How the serialization to arrays happens is, as it should be, irrelevant. The point is that it happens. There are conventional ways to input and output data like this; only in certain cases you'll have to provide client-side configuration to get higher-level implementations but it's not necessary. – Grant Thomas Mar 18 '13 at 12:13

I would suggest you use

[WebMethod]
public int SaveSelectedOffers(IList<string> offers, int selectedRows)
{

}

private void offersAvailableSubmit_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    IList<string> options = new List<string>();
    options.Add("item 1");
    options.Add("item 2");
    options.Add("item 2");

    int rowsAffected = serviceCaller.SaveSelectedOffers(options, rowCount); 
}

Edit #1

Well said by Michael:

Web services can't pass complex types like ArrayList, or at least not without some configuration, so just simplify your web service. - Michael

Edit #2

To make your web service use System.Collections.Generic.List

  1. Right click the service in Service References
  2. Configure Service Reference
  3. in the Data Type group
  4. Change the Collection type to System.Collections.Generic.List
share|improve this answer

Forget all this changing your code nonsense.

If you right-click the service in the "Service References" folder and select "Configure Service Reference" from the context menu then you can specify which type the client should use for collections.

In your case, just select System.Collections.ArrayList from the "Collection type" dropdown.

However, you could specify System.Collections.Generic.List and have strongly-typed generic lists.

share|improve this answer
    
:) Didn't notice someone had posted this; slow connection :( – Tebo Mar 18 '13 at 12:26

I would use a typed list or array in your web method definition. No confusion possible. An arraylist is not strongly typed, which means that the contents cannot be known until run-time.

[WebMethod]
public int SaveSelectedOffers(string[] offers, int selectedRows)
{

}
share|improve this answer

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