Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to parse a file text then to put it into a hash. My file looks like at :

key1 val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val
key2 val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val
key3 val
key4 val,val
key5 val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val

My keys are before space and my values are the list of elements after the space and before each comma. I have some lines where there are not key because the values continue on few lines.

So I want a hash like that (i am most familiar in Python):

hash={'key1':[val,val,...],'key2':[val,val,...]} 

My code : `

my %hashNames;
open INFILE, "./file.txt" or die $!;
my @temp = ();

while (my $line = <INFILE>)
{

    my @names = split /[\t,]/, $line;
    my $ID = $names[0];
    if ( $line =~ /\t/ )
    {

        my @temp=();
        for (my $i = 1; $i < @names; $i +=1)
        {
            push (@temp, $names[$i]);
        }

    }
    else
    {   

        for (my $i = 0; $i < @names; $i +=1)
        {
            push (@temp, $names[$i]);
        }       
    }
}`
share|improve this question
1  
show us what you've tried –  Paul Dixon Mar 18 '13 at 12:14
    
If you know how to do it in Python, show us that please. –  simbabque Mar 18 '13 at 12:20
    
i think that i must read each lines and if there is a space i must create a new key and push the differents values (in a list) and if there is not space i must add the values at the previous key. –  Tof Mar 18 '13 at 12:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The difficulty here is that your records are terminated by “a newline that is not preceded by a comma”. Unfortunately, the input record seperator $/ can't be set to a regex. This leaves three comfortable solutions:

  1. Load the whole file to memory. This isn't as bad as it sounds, because we have the same amount of information in the hash later on. We can the split /(?<!,)\n/ to get the actual records.

    my %hash = do {
      local $/; # set to undef, for slurp
      map {
        my ($key, $vals) = split /\s+/, $_, 2; # split on first whitespace, into two strings
        $key => [ split /\s*,\s*/, $vals ];    # return a list of a key and a value array
      } split /(?<!,)\n/, <FILE>;              # split the file into records
    };
    
  2. We can write a readline substitute that buffers the input and can terminate lines with regexes

  3. We can think of the trailing comma as a line continuation character.

    my %hash;
    while(<FILE>) {
      $_ .= <FILE> while /,\n\z/;
      my ($key, $value) = split /\s+/, $_, 2;
      push @{ $hash{$key} }, split /\s*,\s*/, $value; # allow multiple occurrences of one key, simply append values to list.
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much for yout answer. how can i retrieve the keys and the values of the list? –  Tof Mar 18 '13 at 13:26
    
@Tof I don't quite get that question. For a given $key, you can get the @vals like @vals = @{ $hash{$key} }. You need the @{...}, because that hash can only store a reference to the array, not the array itself, so we have to dereference it back to the array. –  amon Mar 18 '13 at 13:29
    
For example i would retrieve the array for a specific key for then scanning it. –  Tof Mar 18 '13 at 13:35
1  
@Tof How is that an example of anything? See perldoc perldata for information on basic perl structures. –  TLP Mar 18 '13 at 13:44

Your problem is that newlines no longer separate your records. So a way to handle it is to disable the invalid default input record separator $/ and emulate a valid one:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my %hash;
my $file;
{
    local $/;         # disable input record separator
    $file = <DATA>;   # entire file here now!
}

for my $line (split /^(?=\S+ )/m, $file) {  # records begin this way now
    $line =~ s/\n//g;                       # remove newlines
    my ($key, $val) = split ' ', $line, 2;  # divide into two fields
    $hash{$key} = [ split /,/, $val ];      # store the data
}

print Dumper \%hash;

__DATA__
key1 val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val
key2 val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val
key3 val
key4 val,val
key5 val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val

Explanations:

  • Splitting on /^(?=\S+ )/m using the /m modifier means ^ will now match newlines inside the string, which will emulate an input record separator.
  • Splitting the string in two fields is done by adding a LIMIT 2 to the split
  • We split directly into the hash by using an anonymous array [ ... ] with a split statement inside it.
share|improve this answer

Using the Parse::RecDescent module

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Parse::RecDescent;

our %hash;
my $p = Parse::RecDescent->new(q!
  hash: entry(s?)
  entry: key value(s /,/)  { $::hash{$item[1]} = [ @{ $item[2] } ] }
  key: /\S+/
  value: /([^,\n]|\\,])+/
!);
die "$0: failed to create parser" unless defined $p;

my $text = do {{ local $/; <DATA> }};
$p->hash($text) or die "$0: parse failed";

for (sort keys %hash) {
  print "$_ => val x ", scalar @{ $hash{$_} }, "\n";
}

__DATA__
key1 val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val
key2 val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val
key3 val
key4 val,val
key5 val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val

Output:

key1 => val x 22
key2 => val x 22
key3 => val x 1
key4 => val x 2
key5 => val x 52
share|improve this answer

Here ya go:

my %results;
my $key;
while(my $line = <INFILE>) {
    chomp($line);
    my @items = split(/, */, $line);
    $key = shift @items;
    $results{$key} = \@items;
}

Which works for the simple case except for your statement:

I have some lines where there are not key because the values continue on few lines.

To handle that, though, you'll have to explain how to detect whether the next line is a key or a value. If you know, then you can put it in an if statement and use the previous key to add new values to the hash:

my %results;
my $key;
while(my $line = <INFILE>) {
    chomp($line);
    my @items = split(/, */, $line);
    my $tmpkey = shift @items;
    if (is_real_key($tmpkey)) {
        $key = shift @items;
        $results{$key} = \@items;
    } else {
        push (@{$results{$key}}, $tmpkey, @items);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
in fact i have values that continue over multiple lines and so there are not key. –  Tof Mar 18 '13 at 13:03
    
Yeah, I handled that. But you didn't say how you know when the values stop and a new key begins. –  Wes Hardaker Mar 19 '13 at 12:53
#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';

use Data::Dumper;

my $res_hash = {};
my ($current_key, $values);
my $push_again;
while ( my $line = <DATA>) {
  chomp $line;
  push ( @{ $res_hash->{$current_key} }, split(/,/, $values) ) if ( $current_key and $values and ( index($line, ' ') > 0) );
  if ( index($line, ' ') > 0 ){
    $push_again = 0;
    ($current_key, $values) = split( /\s/, $line);    
  } else {
    $values .= $line;
    $push_again = 1;
  }

};
push ( @{ $res_hash->{$current_key} }, split(/,/, $values) ) if $push_again;

say "result:".Dumper($res_hash);



__DATA__
key1 val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val
key2 val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val
key3 val
key4 val,val
key5 val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,
val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val,val
share|improve this answer
1  
You have a missing last record. You must push the buffer after the last loop iteration as well. –  TLP Mar 18 '13 at 13:11
    
you're right, thx - however, I tend to like your solution more –  Tudor Constantin Mar 18 '13 at 13:18
    
Thank you, Tudor. –  TLP Mar 18 '13 at 13:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.