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I am trying to transform a string to a boost::uint64_t the contents of pvalue are 12345678901234567890. the code I'm using right now is:

void setAttribute(EnumAttrTyoe pname, const void *pvalue) {
    if (pname == SESS_ID) {
        const char *raw_sess_id = reinterpret_cast<const char*>(pvalue);
        std::string str_sess_id(raw_sess_id);
        std::cout << "Trying to open session id: '" << str_sess_id << "'\n";
        m_session_id = boost::lexical_cast<unsigned long long>(str_sess_id);
    }
}

This one throws an exception with message "bad lexical cast: source type value could not be interpreted as target." If instead I use this code:

void setAttribute(EnumAttrTyoe pname, const void *pvalue) {
    if (pname == SESS_ID) {
        const char *raw_sess_id = reinterpret_cast<const char*>(pvalue);
        std::string str_sess_id(raw_sess_id);
        std::stringstream ss;
        ss << raw_sess_id;
        ss >> m_session_id;
    }
}

it goes through but the value of m_session_id is 0. I have not yet check the flags of ss but I don't need to be a genious to know it fails. Any ideas what to do now?

UPDATE No C++11, since I cannot use it, and my compiler is VC++ 2008, boost version 1.43.0.

share|improve this question
    
What compiler and boost versions are you using? – Drew Dormann Mar 18 '13 at 14:24
    
boost is 1.43.0, compiler MS VC++ 2008 – Sambatyon Mar 18 '13 at 14:34

This code works for me:

#include <sstream>
#include <cstdint>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
   std::stringstream ss;
   ss << "12345678901234567890";

   std::uint64_t n = 0;
   ss >> n;

   std::cout << n << "\n";
}

Output over at http://liveworkspace.org:

stdout: 12345678901234567890

share|improve this answer

I think your input C-style string is not what you think it is. This use of boost::lexical_cast works for me on boost 1.42:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>
#include <boost/cstdint.hpp>

int main() {
   std::string s = "12345678901234567890";
   boost::uint64_t i = boost::lexical_cast<boost::uint64_t>(s);
   std::cout << i << '\n';
   return 0;
}

My guess is that your input is not zero-terminated, has a suffix you aren't expecting, or has an alternate encoding like UTF16. Or perhaps it isn't even a string.

share|improve this answer
    
I though so too, (in fact that is the reason I built a string with it), in any case, I tried dumping the string, like std::cout << ss.str() << '\n' and the string is definitely there. – Sambatyon Mar 19 '13 at 7:45
    
I wouldn't trust just a print of the string as there may be embedded non-printing characters. I would set a breakpoint in your function and examine the memory at pvalue. It should only contain hex values from 0x30 to 0x39 until the terminating 0x00. Alternatively you can loop over the string and test with isdigit(). – rhashimoto Mar 19 '13 at 14:43

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