Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This may be a specific case but given the right code I'm sure many could take from it.

I have thousands of files in one folder that need to be split up into multiple folders. Each folder needs to have 1 more file than the one before it and needs to be named as such. Each folder needs to have at least X amount of files. For example, here is what the end results might look like if each folder had to have at least 1 file:

U:\Batch\Original\ -->
    file1.xml
    file2.xml
    file3.xml
    file4.xml
    file5.xml
    file6.xml

U:\Batch\Processed\ -->
    folder1.1 -->
        file1.xml
    folder2.2 -->
        file2.xml
        file3.xml
    folder3.3 -->
        file4.xml
        file5.xml
        file6.xml

I have started attempting this on my own but I feel I am way off. Say I needed at least 1000 files in each folder. How would one go about doing this in a .bat program?

share|improve this question
1  
i know this does not lead to an answer given your .bat stipulated limitation but Perl is a great tool to do these kind of things should you find yourself more in this position of needing to do them more –  amphibient Mar 18 '13 at 16:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here you go. This should handle it.

@echo off
setlocal enabledelayedexpansion
set /a "minimum=1000, outer=minimum, inner=1"
set folder_prefix=folder
call :mkfolder

:: dir list, order by name, exclude directories, exclude this batch script
for /f "delims=" %%I in ('dir /b /o:n /a:-d ^| findstr /v "%~nx0"') do (
    if !inner! GTR !outer! (
        set /a "inner=1, outer+=1"
        call :mkfolder
    )
    copy "%%I" "!folder!" >NUL
    set /a "inner+=1"
)

:: rename final directory to reflect the number of files contained within
for /f "delims=" %%I in ("%folder%") do set "to=%%~dpnI"
set /a "inner-=1"
ren "%folder%" "%to%.%inner%"


goto :EOF

:mkfolder
set folder=%folder_prefix%!outer!.!outer!
if not exist "!folder!" mkdir "!folder!"
goto :EOF
share|improve this answer
    
Since the number of files in the folder needs to be part of the folder name (i.e., after the .), the number of files in the last folder will likely not match the value after the . in the folder name. –  James L. Mar 18 '13 at 16:04
    
@JamesL. - OK, it renames the final directory to reflect the number of files it contains now. –  rojo Mar 18 '13 at 16:23
    
@rojo Great! I have one caveat; let's say I need to copy them into a different directory instead of rewriting the same directory? –  Shaz Mar 18 '13 at 16:29
    
@rojo Yes. I assume rename move to copy however I'm not familiar with the way you wrote this. ;) –  Shaz Mar 18 '13 at 16:47
1  
Not really, not without switching to another language. Windows batch for loops are pretty slow. vbscript or jscript might be faster. Of course, most of the time is probably being spent performing the actual copying -- so in that regard, rewriting in a different language might not cause as dramatic an improvement as you might hope. –  rojo Mar 18 '13 at 17:38

You are on the right track. To demonstrate, first we need to create a few files to work with:

md c:\y
cd /d c:\y
for %i in (1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30) do echo.>%i.txt

Now we can run the following batch file from c:\y to create sub folders and copy the files as you indicated (but with 3 as the minimum files in this example):

@echo off

setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion

set cnt=1
set fldr=1
set min=3

for %%i in (*.txt) do (
  if !cnt! GTR !min! (
    set /a cnt-=1
    ren folder!fldr! folder!fldr!.!cnt!
    set cnt=1
    set /a fldr+=1
    set /a min+=1
  )

  md folder!fldr! > nul 2>&1

  copy "%%i" folder!fldr!

  set /a cnt+=1
)

set /a cnt-=1
ren folder!fldr! folder!fldr!.!cnt!
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the help! With your first code block is this supposed to be creating the files? It creates the directory but not the files themselves. Maybe I'm doing something wrong? –  Shaz Mar 18 '13 at 16:14
    
The first code block is just to create 30 files so I could create a test case to demonstrate that the batch file (2nd code block) works. You only need the 2nd code block. Change min to 1000 and (*.txt) to (*.xml). –  James L. Mar 18 '13 at 16:34
    
If you want to move the files instead of copy them, just change the copy command to move in the 2nd code block. –  James L. Mar 18 '13 at 16:47
    
It seems like I've encountered situations in the past where for var in (mask) processes items in an order other than alphabetical. I feel safer parsing dir /o to assert the order I want where order matters. –  rojo Mar 18 '13 at 16:54
    
To create some test files you can use for /l %i in (1,1,20000) do @echo %i> %i.txt:) –  Endoro Mar 18 '13 at 16:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.