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Using Node.js, when one requests a HTTP response, in optimal circumstances, the request comes back with a HTTP response.

However, sometimes the request breaks because the site, for example, has a 404 code, or the site does not exist at all. When requesting a batch of URLs, if there is a 404 code on, say, the 200th URL out of 1000 URLs requested, the entire script breaks. Here is my code:

var hostNames = ['www.gizmodo.com','www.sitethatdoesnotexist123.com','www.google.com'];

for (i; i < hostNames.length; i++){

    var options = {
            host: hostNames[i],
            path: '/'
    };

  (function (i){
    http.get(options, function(res) {

        var obj = {};
        obj.url = hostNames[i];
        obj.statusCode = res.statusCode;
        obj.headers = res.headers;

        db.scrape.save(obj);
    }).on('error',function(e){
    console.log("Error Site: " + hostNames[i]);
    });
  })(i);
};

Is there a way, that for example, if the site does not exist, I simply skip to the next URL, instead of having the script break?

EDIT: Fixed. Thanks user DavidKemp

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5 Answers 5

Use a try/catch block to catch any errors that might occur, and then continue on from there.

For example:

var hostNames = ['www.gizmodo.com','www.sitethatdoesnotexist123.com','www.google.com'];

//moved the function out so we do not have to keep redefining it:
var get_url = function (i){
    http.get(options, function(res) {

        var obj = {};
        obj.url = hostNames[i];
        obj.statusCode = res.statusCode;
        obj.headers = res.headers;

        console.log(JSON.stringify(obj, null, 4));
    })
  };

for (i; i < hostNames.length; i++){

    var options = {
            host: hostNames[i],
            path: '/'
    };
    try {
       get_url(i);
    }
    catch(err){
       //do something with err
    }
};
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After catch(err){, I put in console.log("Error, moving onto next");, however, I still received the events.js:71, throw arguments[1]; // Unhandled 'error' event error. –  theGreenCabbage Mar 18 '13 at 15:39
    
The script, however, works without a broken URL. –  theGreenCabbage Mar 18 '13 at 15:40
1  
doesn't work for async errors. –  David Kemp Mar 18 '13 at 20:11

You need to bind an error handler to your request. I also cleaned up the code a bit.

hostNames.forEach(function(hostname), {
  var req = http.get({host: hostName}, function(res) {  
    var obj = {
      url: hostName,
      statusCode: res.statusCode,
      headers: res.headers
    };
    console.log(JSON.stringify(obj, null, 4));
  });

  req.on('error', function(err){
    console.log('Failed to fetch', hostName);
  });
});
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1  
You can put a little links to the docs too: nodejs.org/api/http.html#http_http_get_options_callback –  David Kemp Mar 18 '13 at 17:27
    
Thanks loganfsmyth. Could you do this for the try-catch method? –  theGreenCabbage Mar 18 '13 at 18:39
    
@theGreenCabbage Nope, try/catch will not work because the error is thrown asynchronously. –  loganfsmyth Mar 18 '13 at 18:48
    
From what you are saying, the example shown above this (code sample demonstrated by Neal) won't work? (It indeed does not work, but I thought it was an error on my part). –  theGreenCabbage Mar 18 '13 at 18:49
1  
@theGreenCabbage Glad to be of help –  David Kemp Mar 18 '13 at 20:10

You can use uncaughtException event. this let script run even after exception. link

process.on('uncaughtException', function(err) {
  console.log('Caught exception: ' + err);
});
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Excuse me. Could you tell me where I would place this in my code? –  theGreenCabbage Mar 18 '13 at 16:03
    
You should place it at start first js file –  Anoop Mar 18 '13 at 16:36
3  
But be aware - this will catch any errors in the process - not just problems with connecting to the server (It's a bit like On Error Resume Next or the @ operator in PHP) - and will make other errors hard to diagnose. –  David Kemp Mar 18 '13 at 20:13
var hostNames = ['www.gizmodo.com','www.sitethatdoesnotexist123.com','www.google.com'];

for (i; i < hostNames.length; i++){

    var options = {
            host: hostNames[i],
            path: '/'
    };

  (function (i){
    http.get(options, function(res) {

        var obj = {};
        obj.url = hostNames[i];
        obj.statusCode = res.statusCode;
        obj.headers = res.headers;

        db.scrape.save(obj);
    }).on('error',function(e){
    console.log("Error Site: " + hostNames[i]);
    });
  })(i);
};

Added a callback for when there's an error. Logs the site that returns an error on console. This error is usually triggered by a 404 or request time is too long.

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The full docs are at http://nodejs.org/api/http.html#http_http_get_options_callback at the time of writing. loganfsmyth's answer provides a useful example.

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