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I'm centering some content (both ways) inside a container element using the method Chris Coyier suggested in CSS-tricks. For the sake of compatibility I'm using a semantic approach instead of the :before pseudo element used in the article. For some reason Firefox (tested on v.19 for Mac) fails and I can't figure out what the right fix is (whereas Safari, Opera, IE9 and Chrome all work the way they should).

I can detect browser and put some conditional rules but I'm interested in fixing this globally if possible.

Here's my code from the modified fiddle I created if you wanna check in different browsers.

CSS:

.block {
    text-align: center;
    background: #c0c0c0;
    margin: 20px 0;
    height: 300px;
}
.content-before {
    content:'';
    display: inline-block;
    height: 100%;
    vertical-align: middle;
    margin-right: -0.25em; /* Adjusts for spacing */
}
.centered {
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    padding: 10px;
    background: #f5f5f5;
}

HTML:

<div>
    <div class="block">
        <span class="content-before"></span>
        <div class="centered">
            <h1>Some text</h1>
            <p>But he stole up to us again, and suddenly clapping
            his hand on my shoulder, said&mdash;"Did ye see anything
            looking like men going towards that ship a while ago?"</p>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The layout is broken because the width of .centered is 100% of the container's width, and inline-block elements don't deal with overflows well (and they get pushed to the next line).

Try setting font-size: 0 for the .block element, then redeclaring the font-size (say, 16px) in .centered. It worked for me - http://jsfiddle.net/teddyrised/hJtpF/4986/

.block {
    font-size: 0;
    /* Rest of the styles here */
}
.centered {
    font-size: 16px;
    /* Rest of the styles here */
}

The only drawback here is that you have to use pixel values to redeclare the font-size - em units (which I personally use most frequently) will not work as the parent has a font-size of 0 (em is a relative unit, and in this case, the em will take reference from the parent font size which is 0, and anything multiplied by zero is zero).

[Edit]: If you don't want to use this dirty hack, then you can also opt to ensure that the width of the child, .centered is not 100% of the parent container's width, so that there is some space left for the empty element .content-before, something along the line of:

.centered {
    box-sizing: border-box; /* So that padding is also taken into account */
    width: 90%;
    /* Rest of the styles here */
}

See fiddle for the second recommendation - http://jsfiddle.net/teddyrised/hJtpF/4988/

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Unfortunately, the drawback with the font-size (in em's) applies to my case. However, this dirty trick seems to be the best approach because the second workaround creates empty spaces on both sides of the content, which also changes when the window gets resized. –  inhan Mar 18 '13 at 16:03
    
In fact, the CSS hacks get so messy I typically opt for a JS-based method :) not a lot of overhead incurred when you already have jQuery running anyway. –  Terry Mar 18 '13 at 16:09
    
Oh no, I totally forgot about the em margins and paddings of the content :/ –  inhan Mar 18 '13 at 16:22
    
I ended up converting all the em's into pixels in necessary rules and I'm sticking with the 0px way. Thanks again. –  inhan Mar 20 '13 at 0:13

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