Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've such C code. On 64-bit linux system the result is: 4294967264 instead of -32. Both clang and gcc produce binary with same incorrect results. The problem in the line:

*v = va_arg(args, long);
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdarg.h>

void setter(long *v, ...)
{
        va_list args;
        va_start(args, v);
        *v = va_arg(args, long);
        va_end(args);
}

int main()
{
        long v = 0;
        setter((long *) &v, -32);
        printf("%ld\n", v);
        return 0;
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You actually need to pass a long to your function. You're passing an int.

setter(&v, -32L);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, totally forgot about this. –  brovko Mar 18 '13 at 16:03

On a x86_64 architecture, the size of long is 64 bit. When you are passing -32 to setter(), its type is int and is only 32-bit. If you want long to be passed, cast it explicitly. For example:

setter((long *) &v, (long)-32);
share|improve this answer
    
-32L is the same and without cast. –  brovko Mar 18 '13 at 16:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.