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We often have a need to turn a string with values separated by some character into a list. I want to write a generic extension method that will turn the string into a list of a specified type. Here is what I have so far:

    public static List<T> ToDelimitedList<T>(this string value, string delimiter)
    {
        if (value == null)
        {
            return new List<T>();
        }

        var output = value.Split(new string[] { delimiter }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
        return output.Select(x => (T)x).ToList();
    }

But I get an error.

Cannot convert type 'string' to type 'T'.

Is there a better way to do this or do I need to create multiple extension methods for the different types of lists and do Convert.ToInt32(), etc?

UPDATE

I'm trying to do things like this:

var someStr = "123,4,56,78,100";
List<int> intList = someStr.ToDelimitedList<int>(",");

or

var someStr = "true;false;true;true;false";
List<bool> boolList = someStr.ToDelimitedList<bool>(";");
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1  
why generic method when the only type involved is string? –  PaRiMaL RaJ Mar 18 '13 at 16:12
    
The string needs to be converted to different types. The values in a string could be 1,2,3,4,5 or true,false,false,true. –  Alex Ford Mar 18 '13 at 16:13
    
you mean parsed? –  Ilya Ivanov Mar 18 '13 at 16:13
    
You have to do a little bit of coding for that! –  PaRiMaL RaJ Mar 18 '13 at 16:15
1  
You don't say... –  Alex Ford Mar 18 '13 at 16:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Convert.ChangeType will work for primitive and many framework types (assuming default parsing rules are good enough):

return output.Select(x => (T) Convert.ChangeType(x, typeof(T)))
             .ToList();

If you need this to work for your own custom types, you'll have to get them to implement the IConvertible interface.

Do bear in mind that this isn't sophisticated enough to work with custom conversion rules or robust enough to deal with failure properly (beyond throwing an exception and making the entire operation fail). If you need support for this, provide an overload that accepts a TypeConverter or conversion delegate (as in mike z's answer).

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3  
+1, wow never knew that there was something like Convert.ChangeType –  PaRiMaL RaJ Mar 18 '13 at 16:15
    
This is awesome. –  Alex Ford Mar 18 '13 at 16:16
    
This worked great, though I am considering just using straight linq as Oliver and p.s.w.g have suggested. –  Alex Ford Mar 18 '13 at 16:22
    
I'm accepting this because it is the answer to the question I asked, but as Ani mentions it is fickle and probably better to use straight LINQ as in @Oliver's answer. –  Alex Ford Mar 18 '13 at 16:51

There is no built in way to convert a string to an arbitrary type T. Your method would have to take some kind of delegate:

public static List<T> ToDelimitedList<T>(this string value, string delimiter, Func<string, T> converter)
{
    if (value == null)
    {
        return new List<T>();
    }

    var output = value.Split(new string[] { delimiter }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
    return output.Select(converter).ToList();
}
share|improve this answer

Seems like you could just use String.Split and Enumerable.Select?

var list = "1,2,3".Split(",").Select(s => int.Parse(s));

But if you must make an extension, try this...

public static List<T> ParseDelimitedList<T>(this string value, string delimiter, Func<string, T> selector)
{
    if (value == null)
    {
        return new List<T>();
    }

    var output = value.Split(new string[] { delimiter }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
    return output.Select(selector).ToList();
}

var list = "1,2,3".ParseDelimitedList(",", s => int.Parse(s));
share|improve this answer
    
This is not generic. It would only return int. –  Alex Ford Mar 18 '13 at 16:12
    
Beat me to it! @AlexFord, it doesn't need to be generic as the Select statement will allow you to provide your generic conversion. –  Oliver Mar 18 '13 at 16:14
    
nice, but maybe he just want a generic solution? –  luis_laurent Mar 18 '13 at 16:14
1  
@luis_laurent see my update –  p.s.w.g Mar 18 '13 at 16:16
4  
@luis_laurent This is a generic solution. Don't re-invent the wheel. There's no reason to combine Split and Select into a single operation. Just call the two methods independently. –  Servy Mar 18 '13 at 16:17

Is this not a perfect task for LINQ?

You could just do something like the following:

"1,2,3,4,5".Split(',').Select(s => Convert.ToInt32(s)).ToList();

You can alter the generic Select() delegate depending on your situation.

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