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For example, if I have

<input type="text" class="input1" value="bla"/>

Is there a way to check if this element exists and has a value in one statement? Or, at least, anything shorter then

if($('.input1').length > 0 && $('input1').val() != '')

Just getting frustrated here with mile-long conditions :( Thanks!

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marked as duplicate by isherwood, X.L.Ant, Roman C, mattytommo, Alex Mar 19 '13 at 9:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Maybe make a helper function if you use the same kind of condition many times. –  mirrormx Mar 18 '13 at 16:14
1  
if($(selector).val()) should work. If the element doesn't exist it will return 'undefined' and if it does but has no length it will return "" (which evaluates as a false). –  Benmj Mar 18 '13 at 16:15
    
@Benmj would 'undefined' evaluate to false as well? I thought it wouldn't. –  Dimskiy Mar 18 '13 at 16:17
    
@isherwood This is not a duplicate. I want to know if the element exists AND has a value at the same time. –  Dimskiy Mar 18 '13 at 16:18
1  
@Dimskiy : it shouldn't if ($('#foobar').val()) { console.log('You will not see this') } –  Benmj Mar 18 '13 at 16:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

The input won't have a value if it doesn't exist. Try this...

if($('input1').val())
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I ended up writing a few small functions, but this example was used, too. –  Dimskiy Mar 18 '13 at 18:09

You can do something like this:

jQuery.fn.existsWithValue = function() { 
    return this.length && this.val().length; 
}

if ($(selector).existsWithValue()) {
        // Do something
}
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You could do:

if($('.input1').length && $('.input1').val().length)

length evaluates to false in a condition, when the value is 0.

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Downvote with no comment? why? –  Mark Walters Mar 18 '13 at 16:15
    
@MarkWalters: There's no downvote here, but it's not much of an improvement over the original. –  the system Mar 18 '13 at 16:17
    
I'll upvote you Curt. The addition of .length is my preference here. –  Robert Waddell Sep 14 '13 at 19:48

Just for the heck of it, I tracked this down in the jQuery code. The .val() function currently starts at line 165 of attributes.js. Here's the relevant section, with my annotations:

val: function( value ) {
    var hooks, ret, isFunction,
        elem = this[0];

        /// NO ARGUMENTS, BECAUSE NOT SETTING VALUE
    if ( !arguments.length ) {

        /// IF NOT DEFINED, THIS BLOCK IS NOT ENTERED. HENCE 'UNDEFINED'
        if ( elem ) {
            hooks = jQuery.valHooks[ elem.type ] || jQuery.valHooks[ elem.nodeName.toLowerCase() ];

            if ( hooks && "get" in hooks && (ret = hooks.get( elem, "value" )) !== undefined ) {
                return ret;
            }

            ret = elem.value;

            /// IF IS DEFINED, JQUERY WILL CHECK TYPE AND RETURN APPROPRIATE 'EMPTY' VALUE
            return typeof ret === "string" ?
                // handle most common string cases
                ret.replace(rreturn, "") :
                // handle cases where value is null/undef or number
                ret == null ? "" : ret;
        }

        return;
    }

So, you'll either get undefined or "" or null -- all of which evaluate as false in if statements.

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