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My program currently reads a text file and compares it with the value in a text box and then tells me how many matches, this currently works.

My query is that it is case sensitive. Is there any way to make it so it doesn't matter whether it is in upper or lower case?

This is my code below:

if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(CustodianEAddress.Text))
{
    for (AddressLength1 = 0; AddressLength1 < Length; AddressLength1++)
    {
        List<string> list1 = new List<string>();
        using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(FileLocation))
        {
            string line1;
            //max 500
            string[] LineArray1 = new string[500];

            while ((line1 = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
            {
                list1.Add(line1); // Add to list.

                if (line1.IndexOf(cust1[AddressLength1].ToString()) != -1)
                {
                    count1++;
                    LineArray1[count1] = line1;
                }
            }

            reader.Close();
            using (System.IO.StreamWriter filed = 
               new System.IO.StreamWriter(FileLocation, true))
            {
                filed.WriteLine("");
                filed.WriteLine("The email address " + 
             cust1[AddressLength1].ToString() + " was found " + count1 +
             " times within the recipient's inbox");
            }

            string count1a;
            count1a = count1.ToString();
        }
    }
}
else
{
    MessageBox.Show("Please Enter an Email Address");
}

So basically, I need to compare the value in cust1[AddressLength1] with any values found in an array which is in the text file.

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2  
Show some code please? It is difficult to read mind. –  shahkalpesh Mar 18 '13 at 16:13
    
I've added some code above if that's any help? –  user2136641 Mar 18 '13 at 16:35

3 Answers 3

String.Compare() takes in an optional parameter that let's you specify whether or not the equality check should be case sensitive.

Edited in response to code being posted

Compare and Index of both take in an optional enumeration, StringComparison. If you choose StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase then case will be ignored.

share|improve this answer
    
I've added some code above if that's any help? –  user2136641 Mar 18 '13 at 16:34
    
+1 to all Compare answers. @user2136641 - please check MSDN - IndexOf have similar parameter to specify case insensitive comparison. –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 18 '13 at 16:40

The fact you are reading from a file or not it does not matter, when compare use the static string Comapare function:

public static int Compare(
    string strA,
    string strB,
    bool ignoreCase
)

and pass true as a last parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
I've added some code above if that's any help? –  user2136641 Mar 18 '13 at 16:33

Here's a quick way to compare two strings without checking case:

string a;
string b;
string.Compare(a, b, true);

The true here is passed as the value of the ignoreCase parameter, meaning that upper and lower-case letters will be compared as if they were all the same case.

EDIT:

I've cleaned up your code a bit, and also put in the compare function. I included comments where I changed stuff:

// Not needed: see below.  List<string> list1 = new List<string>();

using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(FileLocation))
{
    string line1;
    //max 500
    List<string> LineArray1 = new List<string>();

    while ((line1 = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
    {
        // list1.Add(line1); // Add to list.

        // By adding to the list, then searching it, you are searching the whole list for every single new line - you're searching through the same elements multiple times.
        if (string.Compare(line1, cust1[AddressLength1].ToString(), true) == 0)
        {
            // You can just use LineArray1.Count for this instead. count1++;
            LineArray1.Add(line1);
        }
    }

    // Not needed: using() takes care of this.  reader.Close();
    using (System.IO.StreamWriter filed =
        new System.IO.StreamWriter(FileLocation, true))
    {
        filed.WriteLine(); // You don't need an empty string for a newline.
        filed.WriteLine("The email address " +
        cust1[AddressLength1].ToString() + " was found " + LineArray1.Count +
        " times within the recipient's inbox");
    }

    string count1a;
    count1a = LineArray1.Count.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've added some code above if that's any help? –  user2136641 Mar 18 '13 at 16:34
    
Thanks, I'll give this a go now! –  user2136641 Mar 18 '13 at 17:10
    
I've tried it, please see the post above. I received an error message with it. Thanks! –  user2136641 Mar 18 '13 at 17:30
    
Your edit was rejected, but I looked at it: it is unrelated to the code. Some other processing is using the file you're trying to access. –  Steven Westbrook Mar 18 '13 at 17:35
    
Ok thanks for your help Steven –  user2136641 Mar 18 '13 at 17:48

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