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I'm trying to set the figure size with fig1.set_size_inches(5.5,3) on python, but the plot produces a fig where the x label is not completely visibile. The figure itself has the size I need, but it seems like the axis inside is too tall, and the x label just doesn't fit anymore.

here is my code:

fig1 = plt.figure()
fig1.set_size_inches(5.5,4)
fig1.set_dpi(300)
ax = fig1.add_subplot(111)
ax.grid(True,which='both')
ax.hist(driveDistance,100)
ax.set_xlabel('Driven Distance in km')
ax.set_ylabel('Frequency')
fig1.savefig('figure1_distance.png')

and here is the result file:

image with 5.5x3 inch

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Thanks for the edits! ;-) –  otmezger Mar 19 '13 at 16:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could order the save method to take the artist of the x-label into consideration.

This is done with the bbox_extra_artists and the tight layout. The resulting code would be:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
fig1 = plt.figure()
fig1.set_size_inches(5.5,4)
fig1.set_dpi(300)
ax = fig1.add_subplot(111)
ax.grid(True,which='both')
ax.hist(driveDistance,100)
xlabel = ax.set_xlabel('Driven Distance in km')
ax.set_ylabel('Frequency')
fig1.savefig('figure1_distance.png', bbox_extra_artists=[xlabel], bbox_inches='tight')
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Thanks, this did the trick. –  otmezger Mar 18 '13 at 17:37
1  
with subplots you can also use fig1.tight_layout() instead of bbox_inches='tight' –  Francesco Montesano Mar 18 '13 at 19:58
    
only specifying bbox_inches='tight' works for my label-cut-off issue, thanks! –  ecoe Oct 10 '13 at 23:49
1  
Actually, the variable xlabel might not be needed. Only changing the last line of code to fig1.savefig('figure1_distance.png', bbox_inches='tight') will do the work –  Chris.Q Oct 17 at 23:58

It works for me if I initialize the figure with the figsize and dpi as kwargs:

from numpy import random
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
driveDistance = random.exponential(size=100)
fig1 = plt.figure(figsize=(5.5,4),dpi=300)
ax = fig1.add_subplot(111)
ax.grid(True,which='both')
ax.hist(driveDistance,100)
ax.set_xlabel('Driven Distance in km')
ax.set_ylabel('Frequency')
fig1.savefig('figure1_distance.png')

driveDistance

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it didn't work for me... same result as before. The answer from @Tal did work perfectly. Thanks for your help! –  otmezger Mar 18 '13 at 17:36
    
Might be a backend issue, I'm using MacOSX. Anyway, at least you know you can select figure size and dpi from the start :) –  askewchan Mar 18 '13 at 18:05
    
of course, I adopted this part of the code as well. I'm running mac os x as well, python 2.7.3. –  otmezger Mar 18 '13 at 19:54

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