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i have a list

[1,1,1,1,1]

and i am trying to write function which will return list

[2,3,4,5,6]

i want to use function map like this

map (+1) [1,1,1,1,1]

which will return

[2,2,2,2,2]

after that i want to call map function on last four elements of returned list so after i get [2,2,2,2,2] i want to use map on last four [2,2,2,2] that will return [3,3,3,3] and replace last four elements from first map call so i get [2,3,3,3,3] etc..

map (+1)[1,1,1,1,1] 
map (+1)  [2,2,2,2] 
map (+1)    [3,3,3] 
map (+1)      [4,4] 
map (+1)        [5]

returned:

[2,2,2,2,2]
[2,3,3,3,3] 
[2,3,4,4,4]
[2,3,4,5,5]
[2,3,4,5,6]

i need to return only last list... btw this is only Simplified version, originaly i have list of lists ... i just cant figure how to call function how i described.. thanks.

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Should all immediate steps be returned? Or only the last list, [2,3,4,5,6] –  kaan Mar 18 '13 at 16:47
    
And how can we help you? –  Ingo Mar 18 '13 at 16:47
    
only last list [2,3,4,5,6] –  Martin877 Mar 18 '13 at 17:13

6 Answers 6

Would something like this do what you want?

startList = [1,1,1,1] -- orwhatever you want it to be 
map (\(x,i) -> x + i) $ zip startList [1..]

The zip basically pairs each element in the list with what you want to add to it, and the map function then adds each element in the list to that value to get the result you want.

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scanl almost does what you want:

Prelude> scanl (+) 1 [1,1,1,1,1]
[1,2,3,4,5,6]

You could drop the first item, which is just the initial state value we're passing in:

Prelude> tail $ scanl (+) 1 [1,1,1,1,1]
[2,3,4,5,6]
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2  
I don't think OP is seeking this function, though it yields the right answer for the case (+1). For other input function, e.g. (+2), it won't work. –  nymk Mar 18 '13 at 17:07

Your algorithm version O(n2) time:

plusSlow :: [Int] -> [Int]
plusSlow [] = []
plusSlow (x:xs) = (head mapped):(plusSlow $ tail mapped)
                 where mapped = map (+1) (x:xs)

Faster version O(n) time:

plusFast :: [Int] -> [Int]
plusFast x = pf x 1

pf :: [Int] -> Int -> [Int]
pf [] _ = []
pf (x:xs) n = (x+n):(pf xs (n+1))
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I think you want something like

mapTails f [] = []
mapTails f (x:xs) = f x : mapTails f (map f xs)
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You can accomplish what you're looking for using a recursive function, instead:

myFn :: Num a => [a] -> [a]
myFn []     = []
myFn (x:xs) = x + 1 : (myFn $ map (+1) xs)

main = print $ myFn [1,1,1,1,1]  -- Prints [2,3,4,5,6]

See http://codepad.org/wBwynlGt

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IMO the most elegant way would be

zipWith($) $ iterate((+1).) id
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Fantastic! I think it should be zipWith($) $ tail $ iterate((+1).) id. –  nymk Mar 18 '13 at 17:44
    
I like this solution most. The others are either not generic enough or not very elegant. +1. Although I would use more haskelly syntax and no ($): zipWith ($) (iterate (succ .) succ) (replicate 5 1). –  ertes Mar 18 '13 at 23:15

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