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I just came across to this figure in a paper and I'd like to draw a similar one using ggplot2 in R. Any tips?

enter image description here

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closed as not a real question by talonmies, Dason, 3nigma, DarkAjax, agstudy Mar 18 '13 at 21:12

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
Tips: search Google, read the documentation, try something first. :) – summea Mar 18 '13 at 16:48
2  
also, why would you want to make it harder than necessary to decode your graph with this false perspective? – baptiste Mar 18 '13 at 19:00
    
@summea The reason why I posted here as it is, is becasue I did not know what to search for in Google. What is the keyword for that? The things I tried with 3d plotting obviously did not work that is why I posted as it is. – Roark Mar 18 '13 at 21:09
    
@baptiste I came across this that way. That is author's choice which is irrelevant here. So no reason to argue here.. – Roark Mar 18 '13 at 21:10
2  
Maybe you'd have had less downvote and this question wouldn't have been closed if you have shown what you tried (since you said you tried 3d plotting for instance), explained what the graph represent (what are the x and y axis of each slices for instance), gave a small dataset of the kind needed for that representation or even linked to the paper in which you saw it. Additionally why did you specified you wanted it in ggplot2 graphics specifically? As far as I can see it would be trivial in base or even grid(as @agstudy shown) graphics. – plannapus Mar 19 '13 at 7:31

Playing with viewports you can start with something like this.

enter image description here

library(grid)
grid.newpage()
for (x in 0:3){
  vp <- plotViewport(c(10-x,1+3*x,1+2*x,5-x),
                     xscale=c(0,10),yscale=c(0,10),
                     gp=gpar(alpha=1))
  pushViewport(vp)
  ## here I plot some rectangle since I don't have any data
  grid.rect(x=seq(0.5,10,length.out=20),y=0,width=0.5,height=0.5,
            def='native', just='bottom',
            gp=gpar(fill=grey.colors(4)[4-x+1],alpha=0.5))
  ## axes
  grid.lines(def='native',x=c(0,10),y=0,arrow=arrow())
  grid.lines(def='native',y=c(0,10),x=0,arrow=arrow())
  upViewport()
}

PS: I don't think that this is really useful but just as proof of concept that we can do it in R.

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Thanks a lot, I ll look into this in more detail! – Roark Mar 18 '13 at 21:11

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