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I want to be able to list the files in the current directory. I've made something that should work but doesn't return all the file names.

File dir = new File(".");
File[] filesList = dir.listFiles();
for (File file : filesList) {
    if (file.isFile()) {
        System.out.println(file.getName());
    }
}

It returns .classpath, but I'm quite sure I have other java files inside this folder. Maybe the dot notation for current folder is incorrect?

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1  
"I'm quite sure I have other java files inside this folder" Name them (so we can be more sure). –  Andrew Thompson Mar 18 '13 at 16:57
1  
I don't see anything wrong with your code, and your output. –  Maroun Maroun Mar 18 '13 at 16:57
1  
It goes without saying, subdirectories are not listed and neither their contents. –  Joop Eggen Mar 18 '13 at 16:59
3  
"Maybe the dot notation for current folder is incorrect?" Print the result of File.getCanonicalFile() to check the path. –  Andrew Thompson Mar 18 '13 at 16:59
1  
I think I might have found the problem. I assumed the current directory is at src folder (eclipse) but in reality the dot notation points to the folder outside of the src folder. However, src folder is the folder I save my files - therefore I assumed that'd be the current folder. Can anyone explain to me why src isn't the current folder? –  Martynogea Mar 18 '13 at 17:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Maybe the dot notation for current folder is incorrect?

Print the result of File.getCanonicalFile() to check the path.

Can anyone explain to me why src isn't the current folder?

Your IDE is setting the class-path when invoking the JVM.

E.G. (reaches for Netbeans) If you select menus File | Project Properties (all classes) you might see something similar to:

Netbeans project options

It is the Working Directory that is of interest here.

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You should verify that new File(".") is really pointing to where you think it is pointing - .classpath suggests the root of some Eclipse project....

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9  
"You should.." You should make this a comment. –  Andrew Thompson Mar 18 '13 at 17:00

Try this,to retrieve all files inside folder and sub-folder

public static void main(String[]args)
    {
        File curDir = new File(".");
        getAllFilse(curDir);
    }
    private static void getAllFilse(File curDir) {

        File[] filesList = curDir.listFiles();
        for(File f : filesList){
            if(f.isDirectory())
                getAllFilse(f);
            if(f.isFile()){
                System.out.println(f.getName());
            }
        }

    }

To retrieve files/folder only

public static void main(String[]args)
    {
        File curDir = new File(".");
        getAllFilse(curDir);
    }
    private static void getAllFilse(File curDir) {

        File[] filesList = curDir.listFiles();
        for(File f : filesList){
            if(f.isDirectory())
                System.out.println(f.getName());
            if(f.isFile()){
                System.out.println(f.getName());
            }
        }

    }
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I guess here user is saying that he wants to print all the files present in current Directory .. Not in sub-directories too!! –  Vishal K Mar 18 '13 at 17:02

Had a quick snoop around for this one, but this looks like it should work. I haven't tested it yet though.

    File f = new File("."); // current directory

    File[] files = f.listFiles();
    for (File file : files) {
        if (file.isDirectory()) {
            System.out.print("directory:");
        } else {
            System.out.print("     file:");
        }
        System.out.println(file.getCanonicalPath());
    }
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There is nothing wrong with your code. It should list all of the files and directories directly contained by the nominated directory.

The problem is most likely one of the following:

  • The "." directory is not what you expect it to be. The "." pathname actually means the "current directory" or "working directory" for the JVM. You can verify what directory "." actually is by printing out dir.getCanonicalPath().

  • You are misunderstanding what dir.listFiles() returns. It doesn't return all objects in the tree beneath dir. It only returns objects (files, directories, symlinks, etc) that are directly in dir.

The ".classpath" file suggests that you are looking at an Eclipse project directory, and Eclipse projects are normally configured with the Java files in a subdirectory such as "./src". I wouldn't expect to see any Java source code in the "." directory.


Can anyone explain to me why src isn't the current folder?"

Assuming that you are launching an application in Eclipse, then the current folder defaults to the project directory. You can change the default current directory via one of the panels in the Launcher configuration wizard.

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repost of my other comment, "I think I might have found the problem. I assumed the current directory is at src folder (eclipse) but in reality the dot notation points to the folder outside of the src folder. However, src folder is the folder I save my files - therefore I assumed that'd be the current folder. Can anyone explain to me why src isn't the current folder?" –  Martynogea Mar 18 '13 at 17:17

Your code gives expected result,if you compile and run your code standalone(from commandline). As in eclipse for each project by default working directory is project directory that's why you are getting this result.

You can set user.dir property in java as:

   System.setProperty("user.dir", "absolute path of src folder");

then it will give expected result.

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Ummm ... this won't work. There is no way to change what new File(".") means in pure Java. –  Stephen C Mar 18 '13 at 17:33
    
Reference: stackoverflow.com/questions/840190/… –  Stephen C Mar 18 '13 at 17:38

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