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I'm attempting to store pre-aggregated performance metrics in a sharded mongodb according to this document.

I'm trying to update the minute sub-documents in a record that may or may not exist with an upsert like so (self.collection is a pymongo collection instance):

self.collection.update(query, data, upsert=True)

query:

{   '_id': u'12345CHA-2RU020130304',
    'metadata': {   'adaptor_id': 'CHA-2RU',
                    'array_serial': 12345,
                    'date': datetime.datetime(2013, 3, 4, 0, 0, tzinfo=<UTC>),
                    'processor_id': 0}
}

data:

{   'minute': {   '16': {   '45': 1.6693091}}}

The problem is that in this case the 'minute' subdocument always only has the last hour: { minute: metric} entry, the minute subdocument does not create new entries for other hours, it's always overwriting the one entry.

I've also tried this with a $set style data entry:

{ '$set': {   'minute': {   '16': {   '45': 1.6693091}}}}

but it ends up being the same.

What am I doing wrong?

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2 Answers 2

In both of the examples listed you are simply setting a field ('minute')to a particular value, the only reason it is an addition the first time you update is because the field itself does not exist and so must be created.

It's hard to determine exactly what you are shooting for here, but I think what you could do is alter your schema a little so that 'minute' is an array. Then you could use $push to add values regardless of whether they are already present or $addToSet if you don't want duplicates.

I had to alter your document a little to make it valid in the shell, so my _id (and some other fields) are slightly different to yours, but it should still be close enough to be illustrative:

db.foo.find({'_id': 'u12345CHA-2RU020130304'}).pretty()
{
        "_id" : "u12345CHA-2RU020130304",
        "metadata" : {
                "adaptor_id" : "CHA-2RU",
                "array_serial" : 12345,
                "date" : ISODate("2013-03-18T23:28:50.660Z"),
                "processor_id" : 0
        }
}

Now let's add a minute field with an array of documents instead of a single document:

db.foo.update({'_id': 'u12345CHA-2RU020130304'}, { $addToSet : {'minute': { '16': {'45': 1.6693091}}}})
db.foo.find({'_id': 'u12345CHA-2RU020130304'}).pretty()
{
        "_id" : "u12345CHA-2RU020130304",
        "metadata" : {
                "adaptor_id" : "CHA-2RU",
                "array_serial" : 12345,
                "date" : ISODate("2013-03-18T23:28:50.660Z"),
                "processor_id" : 0
        },
        "minute" : [
                {
                        "16" : {
                                "45" : 1.6693091
                        }
                }
        ]
}

Then, to illustrate the addition, add a slightly different entry (since I am using $addToSet this is required for a new field to be added:

db.foo.update({'_id': 'u12345CHA-2RU020130304'}, { $addToSet : {'minute': { '17': {'48': 1.6693391}}}})
db.foo.find({'_id': 'u12345CHA-2RU020130304'}).pretty()
{
        "_id" : "u12345CHA-2RU020130304",
        "metadata" : {
                "adaptor_id" : "CHA-2RU",
                "array_serial" : 12345,
                "date" : ISODate("2013-03-18T23:28:50.660Z"),
                "processor_id" : 0
        },
        "minute" : [
                {
                        "16" : {
                                "45" : 1.6693091
                        }
                },
                {
                        "17" : {
                                "48" : 1.6693391
                        }
                }
        ]
}
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Wouldn't storing the hours: minutes as items in an array negate the seek benefits outlined in the link I mentioned above? Also the 'u' you included in the "_id" isn't meant to be there, it's a python print artifact that denotes unicode. Thanks, I'll think about this. –  Chris Matta Mar 19 '13 at 13:22

I ended up setting the fields like this:

query:

{   '_id': u'12345CHA-2RU020130304',
    'metadata': {   'adaptor_id': 'CHA-2RU',
                    'array_serial': 12345,
                    'date': datetime.datetime(2013, 3, 4, 0, 0, tzinfo=<UTC>),
                    'processor_id': 0}
}

I'm setting the metrics like this:

data = {"$set": {}}

for metric in csv:
  date_utc = metric['date'].astimezone(pytz.utc)
  data["$set"]["minute.%d.%d" % (date_utc.hour,
                                date_utc.minute)] = float(metric['metric'])

which creates data like this:

{"$set": {'minute.16.45': 1.6693091,
          'minute.16.46': 1.566343,
          'minute.16.47': 1.22322}}

So that when self.collection.update(query, data, upsert=True) is run it updates those fields.

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