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I am converting Java code to C#. The StringBuilder class in Java seems to have many more methods than the C# one. I am interested in (say) the Java functionality

sb.indexOf(s);
sb.charAt(i);
sb.deleteCharAt(i);

which seems to be missing in C#.

I suppose the first two could be modelled by

sb.ToString().IndexOf(s);
sb.ToString().CharAt(i);

but would the third operate on a copy of the contents of the sb rather than the actual contents?

Is there a common way of adding this functionality to all missing methods?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use the Chars member collection for .charAt. Similarly, you can use .Remove(i,1) to remove a single char at position i.

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@Joe. Where is Chars - could you give an example. (I looked in msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2839d5h5%28VS.71%29.aspx and didn't find anything) –  peter.murray.rust Oct 10 '09 at 16:07
    
msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… It's a property. In C#, it's done via the indexer (e.g. mySb[idx] ) –  Joe Oct 10 '09 at 16:10

For the third you could use the Remove method:

sb.Remove(i, 1);
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You could use extension methods like the following:

    static class Extensions
    {
        public static int IndexOf(this StringBuilder sb, string value)
        {
            return sb.ToString().IndexOf(value);
        }

//if you must use CharAt instead of indexer
        public static int CharAt(this StringBuilder sb, int index)
        {
            return sb[index];
        }
    }
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@Yuriy I am coming from Java and so naturally look for an identical method first. Thanks for pointing out indexer. –  peter.murray.rust Oct 10 '09 at 16:24

StringBuilder has an indexer, that means you can simply access single characters using sb[i]

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