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I'm using sed to process a very long PeopleSoft trace file. The trace file is full of information, but I am interested in how long each step took to process, and the number of rows affected in the database by the step.

I have a fairly ugly bash script which is basically a one-line series of sed pipes. It works pretty quickly, so it is OK. Of course I would welcome any suggestions to clarify the code.

I must say that while it is ugly, it is clear (to me) what sequential steps it is going through. Often sed/awk one liners are completely unintelligible to a non-expert.

#!/bin/bash

sed '/./=' "$1" | sed '/./N; s/\n/ /' | sed '/--/!d' | sed '/-- B/d' | sed '/--  /d' | sed '/Instance/d' | sed '1,/Application Engine ended normally/!d' | awk '/Row/ {n = $0; getline; print $0 n; next } 1' > "$1".txt

Timings

Most lines contain timing information, in the format for HH:MM:SS. Many statements are running subsecond so the timing field often doesn't change. I'd like to produce a new field which is the offset of the previous line. Only the seconds need to be considered as most operations are subsecond anyway.

246 -- 14.54.43 .(TL_TIMEADMIN.MAIN.Step040) (PeopleCode)238 -- Row(s) affected: 1
247 -- 14.54.43 Program Skipping Step due to non-zero return code from PeopleCode at TL_TIMEADMIN.MAIN.Step040
249 -- 14.54.43 .(TL_TIMEADMIN.MAIN.Step050) (Call Section TL_TIMEADMIN.DISPATCH)
251 -- 14.54.45 ..(TL_TIMEADMIN.DISPATCH.Step02a) (PeopleCode)
253 -- 14.54.45 ..(TL_TIMEADMIN.DISPATCH.Step02a) (SQL)
266 -- 14.54.45 ..(TL_TIMEADMIN.DISPATCH.Step02b) (Call Section TL_TA000200.TA000200)258 -- Row(s) affected: 1
268 -- 14.54.46 ...(TL_TA000200.TA000200.Step001) (PeopleCode)
270 -- 14.54.46 ...(TL_TA000200.TA000200.Step001) (Call Section FUNCLIB_TLTA.STEPMSG)

I would like to see something like this:

246 -- 14.54.43 0 .(TL_TIMEADMIN.MAIN.Step040) (PeopleCode)238 -- Row(s) affected: 1
247 -- 14.54.43 0 Program Skipping Step due to non-zero return code from PeopleCode at TL_TIMEADMIN.MAIN.Step040
249 -- 14.54.43 0 .(TL_TIMEADMIN.MAIN.Step050) (Call Section TL_TIMEADMIN.DISPATCH)
251 -- 14.54.45 2 ..(TL_TIMEADMIN.DISPATCH.Step02a) (PeopleCode)
253 -- 14.54.45 0 ..(TL_TIMEADMIN.DISPATCH.Step02a) (SQL)
266 -- 14.54.45 0 ..(TL_TIMEADMIN.DISPATCH.Step02b) (Call Section TL_TA000200.TA000200)258 -- Row(s) affected: 1
268 -- 14.54.46 1 ...(TL_TA000200.TA000200.Step001) (PeopleCode)
270 -- 14.54.46 0 ...(TL_TA000200.TA000200.Step001) (Call Section FUNCLIB_TLTA.STEPMSG)
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

OK with an awk solution?

{
  split($3, time, ".")
  if (NR == 1) prev = time[3]
  $3 = $3 " " time[3] - prev
  prev = time[3]
  print
}

output:

$ awk -f time.awk input
246 -- 14.54.43 0 .(TL_TIMEADMIN.MAIN.Step040) (PeopleCode)238 -- Row(s) affected: 1
247 -- 14.54.43 0 Program Skipping Step due to non-zero return code from PeopleCode at TL_TIMEADMIN.MAIN.Step040
249 -- 14.54.43 0 .(TL_TIMEADMIN.MAIN.Step050) (Call Section TL_TIMEADMIN.DISPATCH)
251 -- 14.54.45 2 ..(TL_TIMEADMIN.DISPATCH.Step02a) (PeopleCode)
253 -- 14.54.45 0 ..(TL_TIMEADMIN.DISPATCH.Step02a) (SQL)
266 -- 14.54.45 0 ..(TL_TIMEADMIN.DISPATCH.Step02b) (Call Section TL_TA000200.TA000200)258 -- Row(s) affected: 1
268 -- 14.54.46 1 ...(TL_TA000200.TA000200.Step001) (PeopleCode)
270 -- 14.54.46 0 ...(TL_TA000200.TA000200.Step001) (Call Section FUNCLIB_TLTA.STEPMSG)
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1  
An awk solution is just fine... and very clear code also. Thank you very much. –  ardochhigh Mar 18 '13 at 21:01
    
Glad you liked it :-) –  Fredrik Pihl Mar 18 '13 at 21:02
    
In the past I've stayed away from sed/awk/grep for complex problems as I found most materials either too simple or else keyboard diarrhoea. Your code is very clear & helpful - thank you. –  ardochhigh Mar 18 '13 at 21:37

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