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Let a be a list in python.

a = [1,2,3]

When matrix transpose is applied to a, we get:

np.matrix(a).transpose()
matrix([[1],
        [2],
        [3]])

I am looking to generalize this functionality and will next illustrate what I am looking to do with the help of an example. Let b be another list.

b = [[1, 2], [2, 3], [3, 4]]

In a, the list items are 1, 2, and 3. I would like to consider each of [1,2], [2,3], and [3,4] as list items in b, only for the purpose of performing a transpose. I would like the output to be as follows:

array([[[1,2]],
       [[2,3]],
       [[3,4]]])

In general, I would like to be able to specify what a list item would look like, and perform a matrix transpose based on that.

I could just write a few lines of code to do the above, but my purpose of asking this question is to find out if there is an inbuilt numpy functionality or a pythonic way, to do this.

EDIT: unutbu's output below matches the output that I have above. However, I wanted a solution that would work for a more general case. I have posted another input/output below. My initial example wasn't descriptive enough to convey what I wanted to say. Let items in b be [1,2], [2,3], [3,4], and [5,6]. Then the output given below would be of doing a matrix transpose on higher dimension elements. More generally, once I describe what an 'item' would look like, I would like to know if there is a way to do something like a transpose.

Input: b = [[[1, 2], [2, 3]], [[3, 4], [5,6]]]
Output: array([[[1,2], [3,4]],
               [[2,3], [5,6]]])
share|improve this question
    
You could use tuples instead of lists to indicate indivisible matrix elements. – Asad Saeeduddin Mar 18 '13 at 17:36
    
NumPy matrices are always 2-dimensional. Your desired matrix is 3-dimensional. – unutbu Mar 18 '13 at 17:36
    
Did you change the problem or edit the solution into the question? – Asad Saeeduddin Mar 18 '13 at 17:48
    
@Asad I just commented below on unutbu's post. – rsimha Mar 18 '13 at 17:51
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your desired array has shape (3,1,2). b has shape (3,2). To stick an extra axis in the middle, use b[:,None,:], or (equivalently) b[:, np.newaxis, :]. Look for "newaxis" in the section on Basic Slicing.

In [178]: b = np.array([[1, 2], [2, 3], [3, 4]])

In [179]: b
Out[179]: 
array([[1, 2],
       [2, 3],
       [3, 4]])

In [202]: b[:,None,:]
Out[202]: 
array([[[1, 2]],

       [[2, 3]],

       [[3, 4]]])

Another userful tool is np.swapaxes:

In [222]: b = np.array([[[1, 2], [2, 3]], [[3, 4], [5,6]]])

In [223]: b.swapaxes(0,1)
Out[223]: 
array([[[1, 2],
        [3, 4]],

       [[2, 3],
        [5, 6]]])

The transpose, b.T is the same as swapping the first and last axes, b.swapaxes(0,-1):

In [226]: b.T
Out[226]: 
array([[[1, 3],
        [2, 5]],

       [[2, 4],
        [3, 6]]])

In [227]: b.swapaxes(0,-1)
Out[227]: 
array([[[1, 3],
        [2, 5]],

       [[2, 4],
        [3, 6]]])

Summary:

  • Use np.newaxis (or None) to add new axes. (Thus, increasing the dimension of the array)
  • Use np.swapaxes to swap any two axes.
  • Use np.transpose to permute all the axes at once. (Thanks to @jorgeca for pointing this out.)
  • Use np.rollaxis to "rotate" the axes.
share|improve this answer
    
I just changed the output type in my post to match yours. However, if you look at your output it doesn't match with that specified in my post. You could imagine my output to be a column matrix whose items are all lists. – rsimha Mar 18 '13 at 17:50
    
@rsimha: Indeed, I misread the placement of the brackets. Your desired array has shape (3,1,2). b has shape (3,2). To stick an extra dimension (err, "axis") in the middle, use b[:,None,:]. – unutbu Mar 18 '13 at 17:59
    
Thanks. This matches the output in my post. However, I wanted a solution that would work for a more general case. I have posted another input/output. My initial example wasn't descriptive enough to convey what I wanted to say. – rsimha Mar 18 '13 at 19:06
    
@rsimha this does work in general. It lets you add dimensions as you like, you just have to choose the right set of slicing indices. – David Z Mar 18 '13 at 19:08
1  
I'd also mention the transpose method, which can replace a bunch of swapaxes calls because it lets you apply a permutation to the axes instead of just a transposition. – jorgeca Mar 18 '13 at 21:09

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