Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm currently coding the n-puzzle in C++, although for some reason I can't swap the elements of the board. Let me explain. I have a "Piece" class(some methods of the class):

Piece::Piece(int l, int c, int n):
line(l), 
column(c), 
number(n)
{

}

int Piece::getLine()
{
  return line;
}

int Piece::getColumn() const
{
  return column;
}

int Piece::getNumber() const
{
  return number;
}

void Piece::setLine(const int new_line)
{
  this -> line = new_line;
}

void Piece::setColumn(const int new_column)
{
  this -> column = new_column;
}

void Piece::setNumber(const int new_number)
{
  this -> number = new_number;
}

I also have a Board class where the game is executed. The Board is a vector of vectors of type "Piece". The board is being created with the following code:

for(size_t i = 0; i < this -> width; i++)
  {
    vector<Piece> row;

    for(size_t j = 0; j < this -> height; j++)
    {
      row.push_back(Piece(i, j, ((j == this -> width - 1) && (i == this -> height - 1) ? 0 : i * this -> width + j + 1)));
    }  
    board.push_back(row);
  }

Nothing is wrong till here. The problem is when I want to swap two elements of the Board. Imagine we have a 3x3 game. If I run the following code the result will be wrong

swapPieces(board[0][0], board[1][0]);
swapPieces(board[1][0], board[2][0]);
cout << board[0][0] << "\t" << board[0][0].getLine() << endl;

The puzzle is correct:

4 2 3

7 5 6

1 8 0

But by executing board [0][0].getLine() the output is 1, which is the initial position of the Piece! I really don't know what I'm doing wrong. I'd appreciate if someone could give me a hand :)

EDIT: swapPieces added:

void Board::swapPieces(Piece &p1, Piece &p2)
{
  Piece p = p1;
  p1 = p2;
  p2 = p;
}
share|improve this question
    
At the minimum, we need to see some more code showing the exact declaration and definition of board and, of course, swapPieces. –  Daniel Frey Mar 18 '13 at 17:49
1  
the problem is that you have not given us code of the swapPieces function whereas you know that the problem is in this function... –  Stephane Rolland Mar 18 '13 at 17:51
    
Stephane Rolland: I've added the swapPieces, it was my mistake! Sorry. –  pluralism Mar 18 '13 at 17:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The codebase really has two ways to represent Piece position. One is the "line" and "column" variables within your Piece object, and another is ordering of Piece objects within the board and Vector row containers. A fundamental principle of programming is DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself). It leads to errors just like you're encountering now. swapPieces may be swapping the objects within the container, but not updating the object variables. You can patch this in the swapPieces code by making the two representations consistent (set your line and column variables), but it would be cleaner in the long term to decide which of the two is redundant.

share|improve this answer
    
Or just change swapPieces like this: int n = p1.number; p1.number = p2.number; p2.number = n; –  Roddy Mar 18 '13 at 18:07
    
Your suggested code would work in the immediate term, but if additional member variables were added to Piece, you would have to remember to revisit the swapPieces code again. If the variables are protected or private, then you're in for more work. Additionally, other parts of the codebase which may keep a pointer to a game piece would likely be impacted. –  Digikata Mar 18 '13 at 18:14
    
So, what would be the best solution to swap the two pieces in the board? I've now tried with setLine() and setColumn() in the different pieces and it worked, but the code seems unreadable. Although, I'm accepting your answer :) –  pluralism Mar 18 '13 at 18:20
1  
Based on just a glimpse of the code so far, I'd leave swapPieces alone, then remove the line & column variables in Piece, and give your Board class the responsibility of tracking which line and column a given Piece is in - e.g maybe a Board::whereIs( Piece*, int& row, int& col) function. A dumb but simple search (e.g. stl::find via each row) would identify the line and column of a Piece. If later that becomes a performance bottleneck, you can then re-design the internals of how Board stores and searches through the Pieces without affecting how code outside of Board accesses Piece objects. –  Digikata Mar 18 '13 at 18:33

First make sure your copy c'tor is actually called ( I haven't seen implementation). Second make sure when you take board[0][0] you take the actual Object and not a copy of it

share|improve this answer

The swapPieces seems to work, but unless you also call setLine and setColumn the pieces will not know that they have been moved. Right now, the pieces will contain their original position as set in the constructor.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.