Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a scheduled unix script that I want to log the output of. I am unable to edit the cron file due to the user interface restrictions, and I am unable to add >> logfile to the command. Is there something I can add within the script itself to send the output to a log?

{

printf poo

 #Do not change
PRINTF=/usr/bin/printf
MSMTP=/usr/local/bin/msmtp
MSMTPCONF=/var/etc/msmtp.conf

 #Can be changed
FROM="nas4free@usinfosec.com"
TO="dpatino@usinfosec.com"
MDIR="CaseData"
SUBJECT="$MDIR Backup Report"


} > /mnt/support/logs/$SUBJECT.log
#BODY="$(cat /mnt/support/logs/test.log)"
#$PRINTF "From:$FROM\nTo:$TO\nSubject:$SUBJECT\n\n$BODY" | $MSMTP --file=$MSMTPCONF -t
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Try

#!/bin/bash
exec > /tmp/myLog.log 2>&1
set -x

The log shows:

+ echo 'Hello World!'
Hello World!
share|improve this answer

One way is to wrap your script in braces and redirect the output as shown below:

#!/bin/bash
{
# script contents here
echo running script
} > logfile
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this and it worked until I added a variable in the logfile name. I've added my code to the question. –  Daryl Patino Mar 18 '13 at 19:06
1  
move the SUBJECT variable assignment outside the braces. –  dogbane Mar 19 '13 at 8:14

Append following line in starting of your script

log_file_path="/tmp/output.log"
log() { while IFS='' read -r line; do echo "$line" >> "$log_file_path"; done; };
exec > >(tee >(log)) 2>&1

Your script with modification

PRINTF=/usr/bin/printf
MSMTP=/usr/local/bin/msmtp
MSMTPCONF=/var/etc/msmtp.conf
FROM="nas4free@usinfosec.com"
TO="dpatino@usinfosec.com"
MDIR="CaseData"
SUBJECT="$MDIR Backup Report"

{

printf poo  


} > /mnt/support/logs/$SUBJECT.log
#BODY="$(cat /mnt/support/logs/test.log)"
#$PRINTF "From:$FROM\nTo:$TO\nSubject:$SUBJECT\n\n$BODY" | $MSMTP --file=$MSMTPCONF -t
share|improve this answer
    
I don't really understand what that's doing. I put that at the top of the script? –  Daryl Patino Mar 18 '13 at 18:15
    
@DarylPatino Find better explanation here stackoverflow.com/questions/3173131/…. –  Vivek Goel Mar 18 '13 at 18:19
    
Thanks, that's for bash. I need something for sh. –  Daryl Patino Mar 18 '13 at 18:39
    
@DarylPatino Please see updated answer. In your code you need to move variable out. So you can use variable in that scope. –  Vivek Goel Mar 19 '13 at 3:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.