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GHCI seems to cache the results of functions during an interactive session. It's easy to notice, just call a time-consuming function twice. On the second time, the result will appear immediately.

Is there a way to clear this cache from within GHCI so I don't have to restart it? I'm doing some quick'n'dirty non-detailed performance comparisons, so using System.CPUTime instead would be overkill.

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2  
Could you give an example of a specific function call that gets cached, please? –  dave4420 Mar 18 '13 at 18:13
    
let f = 1 : map (2*) f and then last $ show $ f !! 200000. On the first time, it takes about 15sec on my machine but is calculated immediately on the second time. –  user42179 Mar 18 '13 at 18:30
6  
That's not a function. –  pelotom Mar 18 '13 at 18:31
2  
That is just lazy evaluation. In ML let f = some_computation would be evaluated once, when that line was first encountered. In Haskell it is computed at most once when it is actually needed. –  Philip JF Mar 18 '13 at 18:33
5  
let f = undefined will free it. If you want to use the definition of f over and over again while recalculating it every time, you can use a self-contained let-binding, i.e. let f = ... in <calculation> and change <calculation> for each different expression involving f. Finally, you could defeat memoization by making f polymorphic, e.g. let f :: Num a => [a]; f = 1 : map (2*) f. –  pelotom Mar 18 '13 at 20:02

4 Answers 4

You can always reload the module you're working in via the command :r. This will throw away any interactive bindings you have made, and that might not always be practical if you're just poking around. This also works if you're not actually using a module.

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As the comments note, you're using let to bind a name to a value which is the result of applying a function. If you want to keep the value around, don't name it in a let! (or just don't refer to the value you've already computed in a let).

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This isn't always simple -- for example, the example OP provided is recursive, so without fix it's hard to define without a let –  amindfv Mar 18 '13 at 19:52
5  
let f = foo f will give a binding. let f = foo f in f will not. simple! –  sclv Mar 18 '13 at 20:13

GHCi has a +r option, which, according to the manual, should do what you want:

Normally, any evaluation of top-level expressions (otherwise known as CAFs or Constant Applicative Forms) in loaded modules is retained between evaluations. Turning on +r causes all evaluation of top-level expressions to be discarded after each evaluation (they are still retained during a single evaluation).

This option may help if the evaluated top-level expressions are consuming large amounts of space, or if you need repeatable performance measurements.

Note that it talks about constant applicative forms, not functions. However, I couldn't get it to work for your example:

Prelude> :set +r
Prelude> :set +s
Prelude> let f = 1 : map (2*) f
(0.01 secs, 1222216 bytes)
Prelude> last $ show $ f !! 100000
'6'
(3.54 secs, 641914476 bytes)
Prelude> last $ show $ f !! 100000
'6'
(0.04 secs, 1634552 bytes)
Prelude> last $ show $ f !! 100000
'6'
(0.04 secs, 1603568 bytes)

Apparently, +r only works for compiled code, though the docs don't mention this.

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To summarize,

>>> :set +s  -- activate performance 
>>> :r       -- reset all interactive binding
Ok, modules loaded: none.
>>> :show bindings -- check the binding state

Let's start the test,

>>> let f = 1 : map (2*) f
(0.01 secs, 1543272 bytes)
>>> :show bindings 
f :: [Integer] = _
>>> last $ show $ f !! 50000
'6'
(0.55 secs, 170011128 bytes)
>>> :show bindings 
f :: [Integer] = 1 : 2 : 4 : 8 : 16 : ....
it :: Char = '6'
>>> last $ show $ f !! 50000
'6'
(0.02 secs, 1562456 bytes)

Using undefined,

>>> let f = undefined 
(0.01 secs, 565912 bytes)
>>> :show bindings 
it :: Char = '6'
f :: a = _
>>> let f = 1 : map (2*) f
(0.01 secs, 513304 bytes)
>>> last $ show $ f !! 50000
'6'
(0.94 secs, 170517840 bytes)
>>> :show bindings 
f :: [Integer] = 1 : 2 : 4 : 8 : 16 : ....
it :: Char = '6'

reset the binding,

>>> :r
>>> :show bindings 
Ok, modules loaded: none.

Another studie case,

>>> let h = (2*)
(0.01 secs, 590232 bytes)
>>> let f = 1 : map h f
(0.01 secs, 1138792 bytes)
>>> :show bindings 
it :: Char = '6'
h :: Integer -> Integer = _
f :: [Integer] = _
>>> last $ show $ f !! 60000
'6'
(1.69 secs, 241802432 bytes)
>>> last $ show $ f !! 60000
'6'
(0.03 secs, 2002432 bytes)

Still cached, change the binding of h to see,

>>> let h = (3*)
(0.01 secs, 547208 bytes)
>>> last $ show $ f !! 60000
'6'
(0.03 secs, 2029592 bytes)
>>> :show bindings 
f :: [Integer] = 1 : 2 : 4 : 8 : 16 : ....
h :: Integer -> Integer = _
it :: Char = '6'

Do no matter, need to redefine f also,

>>> let f = 1 : map h f
(0.01 secs, 552048 bytes)
>>> last $ show $ f !! 60000
'1'
(4.36 secs, 374064760 bytes)

Using Let .. in ... binding,

>>> let f = let h = (2*) in 1 : map h f
(0.02 secs, 1068272 bytes)
>>> last $ show $ f !! 60000
'6'
(3.90 secs, 242190168 bytes)
>>> last $ show $ f !! 60000
'6'
(4.89 secs, 242271560 bytes)
>>> last $ show $ f !! 60000
'6'
(5.71 secs, 242196976 bytes)
>>> :show bindings 
h :: Integer -> Integer = _
f :: Num a => [a] = _
it :: Char = '6'
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