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NOTE: The motivation for this question is to understand git better, and not to solve any specific problem. IOW, alternative ways "to achieve the same thing" (i.e. side-stepping the question in the title) would be beside the point.

The command

git pull

...is supposed to be equivalent to the sequence

git fetch
git merge

Can git pull <REMOTE> <BRANCH> (i.e. with explicit arguments for the remote and the branch to pull from it) be decomposed into a similar sequence of a fetch followed by a merge?

I imagine that the fetch part would be simply

git fetch <REMOTE> <BRANCH>

...but, if so, I can't figure out the correct git merge ... to follow it with.


I've tried the "obvious" things. E.g., if I run git branch -r, the output lists <REMOTE>/<BRANCH> among the branches, so I tried git merge -m 'some message' <REMOTE>/<BRANCH>, but git replies with Already up-to-date., and git-log shows that HEAD remains at the same commit it was before the attempted git merge. To confirm this I bracketed the git fetch ... and git merge ... with calls to git log ..., like this:

git log --all --oneline --graph --decorate -10
git fetch <REMOTE> <BRANCH>
git merge -m 'some message' <REMOTE>/<BRANCH>
git log --all --oneline --graph --decorate -10

The outputs produced by the two calls to git log ... are identical, and they both show the local <BRANCH> as being ahead of <REMOTE>/<BRANCH>.


The following toy example, in the form of a /bin/sh script reproduces the results I've described above. (The script was tested on Ubuntu Linux; YMMV.)

#!/bin/sh

BASEDIR=/tmp/gittest
REMOTENAME=remrepo
REMOTEURL="$BASEDIR/$REMOTENAME"
BRANCHNAME=test
BRANCHNAME=master

rm -rf $REMOTEURL
mkdir -p $REMOTEURL

rm -rf $BASEDIR/clone1 $BASEDIR/clone2

git init --bare -q $REMOTEURL/.git
git clone -q -o $REMOTENAME $REMOTEURL $BASEDIR/clone1
git clone -q -o $REMOTENAME $REMOTEURL $BASEDIR/clone2

pushd $BASEDIR/clone1 >/dev/null
git checkout -qb $BRANCHNAME
echo $RANDOM >> random1.txt
git add .
git commit -qam "$(date -Ins)"
git push -q $REMOTENAME $BRANCHNAME

pushd $BASEDIR/clone2 >/dev/null
git pull -q $REMOTENAME
git checkout -q $BRANCHNAME
echo $RANDOM >> random2.txt
git add .
git commit -qam "$(date -Ins)"
git push -q $REMOTENAME $BRANCHNAME

echo
echo 'git log --all --oneline --decorate --graph :'
git log --all --oneline --decorate --graph
echo

pushd >/dev/null
git checkout -q $BRANCHNAME
echo $RANDOM >> random1.txt
git commit -qam "$(date -Ins)"

echo 'git log --all --oneline --decorate --graph :'
git log --all --oneline --decorate --graph
echo

git fetch -q $REMOTENAME $BRANCHNAME
git merge -m "$(date -Ins)" $REMOTENAME/$BRANCHNAME

echo
echo 'git log --all --oneline --decorate --graph :'
git log --all --oneline --decorate --graph

git pull -q --no-edit $REMOTENAME $BRANCHNAME

echo
echo 'git log --all --oneline --decorate --graph :'
git log --all --oneline --decorate --graph

If you run it, the output will resemble the following:

warning: You appear to have cloned an empty repository.
warning: You appear to have cloned an empty repository.

git log --all --oneline --decorate --graph :
* 2326793 (HEAD, remrepo/master, master) 2013-03-19T10:56:42,838038000-0400
* 34ea848 2013-03-19T10:56:42,360743000-0400

git log --all --oneline --decorate --graph :
* 81cb43f (HEAD, master) 2013-03-19T10:56:43,057198000-0400
* 34ea848 (remrepo/master) 2013-03-19T10:56:42,360743000-0400

Already up-to-date.

git log --all --oneline --decorate --graph :
* 81cb43f (HEAD, master) 2013-03-19T10:56:43,057198000-0400
* 34ea848 (remrepo/master) 2013-03-19T10:56:42,360743000-0400

git log --all --oneline --decorate --graph :
*   e60b993 (HEAD, master) Merge branch 'master' of /tmp/gittest/remrepo
|\
| * 2326793 2013-03-19T10:56:42,838038000-0400
* | 81cb43f 2013-03-19T10:56:43,057198000-0400
|/
* 34ea848 (remrepo/master) 2013-03-19T10:56:42,360743000-0400

As you can see from the output above,

  1. The fetch + merge sequence near the end has no effect on the output of git log...
  2. The output of the git merge command is Already up-to-date., even this is not the case (the remote and the local repos have diverged by one commit each).
  3. After this "merge", the local branch (master) is one commit ahead of the tracking branch (remrepo/master).
  4. In contrast to the fetch + merge sequence, the pull does the right thing (i.e. it updates the tracking branch, and carries out the merge), even though both sets of commands have received exactly the same information.
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1  
You could always try GIT_TRACE=2 git pull and look at the debug output... –  twalberg Mar 18 '13 at 20:52
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the problem is that your toy example uses git fetch <repository> <branch> — the refspec consisting solely of a branch name is interpreted as the name of a branch on the remote, which is fetched, and the SHA-1 name of its tip commit is written to the .git/FETCH_HEAD file; no local branch is updated as the refspec misses the ":destination" part (what local branch to update with what was fetched). So basically your git fetch does a dry run.

Please re-read the git-fetch manual.

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What I find bewildering is that git pull <REMOTE> <BRANCH> appears to do the right thing, without requiring specifying the :destination part... It's extremely confusing. –  kjo Mar 19 '13 at 14:36
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As the man page for git pull says:

Incorporates changes from a remote repository into the current branch. In its default mode, git pull is shorthand for git fetch followed by git merge FETCH_HEAD.

More precisely, git pull runs git fetch with the given parameters and calls git merge to merge the retrieved branch heads into the current branch. With --rebase, it runs git rebase instead of git merge.

Based on that (and assuming you're not using --rebase), git pull command should be almost equivalent to:

# Fetch the info about the branch from the remote
git fetch <REMOTE> <BRANCH>:<REMOTE>/<BRANCH>

# Switches your working copy to the branch that you would like the
# changes to be merged into
git checkout <LOCAL_BRANCH_NAME>

# Merge the changes from <REMOTE>/<REMOTE_BRANCH_NAME> into your
# currently checked out branch which should <LOCAL_BRANCH_NAME>
# after the previous checkout command
git merge <REMOTE>/<REMOTE_BRANCH_NAME>

There is usually no harm in bringing in the info about all refs from the remote (unless you have some specific requirements not to). If you're okay with that, the first git fetch can be run without any refspec, i.e.

git fetch <REMOTE>

If you used the --rebase option, the git merge command would be replaced by the following git rebase command:

git rebase <REMOTE>/<REMOTE_BRANCH_NAME>

PS: Unlike git merge, git rebase takes an optional target branch argument as well. If you do not specify, it is going to use the currently checked out branch.

Thanks to kostix for pointing the local-branch:remote-branch syntax of git fetch

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As I wrote in my post, when I do git merge <REMOTE>/<REMOTE_BRANCH_NAME>, nothing happens (except for the Already up-to-date. output). –  kjo Mar 18 '13 at 20:37
    
Can you look at the output of git log --all --format=oneline --abbrev-commit --decorate --graph to confirm if the refs <REMOTE>/<REMOTE_BRANCH_NAME> and your <LOCAL_BRANCH_NAME> are actually at different commits ? –  Tuxdude Mar 18 '13 at 21:18
    
@kjo - obvious question, but since you have not stated it explicitly, are you currently in LOCAL_BRANCH_NAME ? Does git branch show an asterik in front of the LOCAL_BRANCH ? –  Tuxdude Mar 18 '13 at 23:16
    
Yes, most definitely, the current branch (with the asterisk) is LOCAL_BRANCH_NAME. (BTW, in this case, both local and remote branches have the same "basename".) –  kjo Mar 18 '13 at 23:41
    
I've added a script that reproduces what I described in a toy example. –  kjo Mar 19 '13 at 2:27
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The short answer is...

git pull <remote> <branch>

Is functionally equivalent to:

git fetch <remote>
git merge <remote>/<remote_branch>

If you are getting a response saying everything is up to date, then you have either not run git fetch <remote> OR you actually are up to date.


EDIT: After reading some of your comments on a different answer, it sounds like you have run the git merge <remote>/<branch> command but are not getting an update, even though you verified that they are on different commits. Try these steps (potentially repetitive, but give it a try)

git log -1 <local_branch>
git log -1 <remote>/<remote_branch>

If these two are NOT the same, then try the following.
(If the are the same, then your already up to date!)

git checkout <local_branch>
git merge <remote>/<remote_branch>

If it still says you are up to date, then perhaps you locally have commits you need to push up, maybe thats why you are seeing different commits.

git push <remote> <local_branch>:<remote_branch>

Using the branch:branch format is just a way of being very specific about what your trying to push. It says push :

Now check those logs again..

git log -1 <local_branch>
git log -1 <remote>/<remote_branch>

If you STILL see a different commit - then you have an edge case indeed. Try copying the commit hash you get for the log on /. Then merge it into your local branch directly

git merge <SHA1>
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I've added a script that reproduces what I described in a toy example. –  kjo Mar 19 '13 at 2:27
    
Your script appears to not use the command as I pointed out above. git fetch <remote> - dont specify the branch - theres usually no need for to be that specific about the fetch, it just updates your machine so that it knows whats in the remote. –  eddiemoya Mar 19 '13 at 16:54
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