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I'm attempting to make the navigation bar stick to the top, when the user scrolls down to the nav bar and then unstick when the user scrolls back up past the navbar. I understand that this can only be implemented via JavaScript. I'm a beginner to JavaScript, so the easier the better. The JSFIDDLE is here.

The HTML is as follows:

   <section class="main">
     <div id="wrap">
        <div id="featured">
     <div class="wrap">      
  <div class="textwidget">
    <div class="cup"><img src="#""></div>
<div id="header"></div></div></div></div></div></div></div>
<div class="whiteboard">
         <h1><a href="#">HELLO GUYS</a></h1> </div>
   </div>
          <div class="bg1">
            <h2> WE ARE AN EVENTS MANAGEMENT COMPANY BASED IN LONDON. </h2></div>

The CSS is as follows:

      .main{text-align:center;}

      h1{
          -webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased;
              display:inline-block;
            font: 800 1.313em "proxima-nova",sans-serif; 
            padding: 10px 10px;
            margin: 20px 20px;
            letter-spacing: 8px;
            text-transform: uppercase;
              font-size:3.125em;
              text-align: center; 
              max-width: 606px;
      line-height: 1.45em;
      position: scroll;
          background-color:#e94f78;
          text-decoration: none;
          color:yellow;
          background-image:url;
      }

      h1 a{
        text-decoration: none;
        color:yellow;
                padding-left: 0.15em;
      }

      h2{
          -webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased;
              display:inline-block;
            font: 800 1.313em "proxima-nova",sans-serif; 
            letter-spacing: 8px;
            margin-top: 100px;
            text-transform: uppercase;
              font-size:3.125em;
              text-align: center; 
      line-height: 1.45em;
      position: scroll;
          text-decoration: none;
          color:white;
          z-index: -9999;
      }

      h2 a{
        text-decoration: none;
        color:white;
                padding-left: 0.15em;
      }

      h5{

      position: absolute;
              font-family:sans-serif; 
              font-weight:bold; 
              font-size:40px; 
              text-align: center; 
              float: right;
              background-color:#fff;
              margin-top: -80px;
              margin-left: 280px;
      }

      h5 a{

        text-decoration: none;
        color:red;
      }

      h5 a:hover{

        color:yellow;
      }

      #text1{
          -webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased;
              display:inline-block;
            font: 800 1.313em "proxima-nova",sans-serif; 
            margin: 20px 20px;
            letter-spacing: 8px;
            text-transform: uppercase;
              font-size:3.125em;
              text-align: center; 
              max-width: 606px;
      line-height: 1.45em;
      position: scroll;
          background-color:#E94F78;

      }

      #text1 a{
          color:yellow;
          text-decoration: none;
              padding-left: 0.15em;


      }

      #text1 a:hover{

          text-decoration: none;
          cursor:pointer;
      }

      .whiteboard{
          background-image:url(http://krystalrae.com/img/krystalrae-2012-fall-print-leopard-sketch.jpg);
          background-position: center;
          padding: ;
          background-color: #fff;
          z-index: 1000;
      }

      .bg{
        height:2000px;
        background-color:#ff0;
        background-image:url(http://alwayscreative.net/images/stars-last.jpg);
        position:relative;
        z-index: -9999;

      }
      .bg1{
        background-image:url(http://alwayscreative.net/images/stars-last.jpg);
        z-index: -9999;
        height:1000px;
      }
      /* Header */
      #wrap {
        margin: 0 auto;
        padding: 0;
        width: 100%;
      }

      #featured {
        background: #E94F78 url(http://www.creativityfluid.com/wp-content/themes/creativityfluid/images/img-bubbles-red.png) no-repeat top;
        background-size: 385px 465px;
        color: #fff;
        height: 535px;
        overflow: hidden;
        position: relative;
        z-index: -2;
      }


      #featured .wrap {
        overflow: hidden;
        clear: both;
        padding: 70px 0 30px;
        position: fixed;
        z-index: -1;
        width: 100%;
      }


      #featured .wrap .widget {
        width: 80%;
        max-width: 1040px;
        margin: 0 auto;
      }

      #featured h1,
      #featured h3,
      #featured p {
        color: yellow;
        text-shadow: none;
      }

      #featured h4{
        color:white;
        text-shadow:none;
      }

      #featured h4 {
        margin: 0 0 30px;
      }

      #featured h3 {
        font-family: 'proxima-nova-sc-osf', arial, serif;
        font-weight: 600;
        letter-spacing: 3px;
      }

      #featured h1 {
        margin: 0;
      }

      .textwidget{
        padding: 0;
      }

      .cup{
        margin-top:210px;
        z-index: 999999;
      }

      .container{font-size:14px; margin:0 auto; width:960px}
      .test_content{margin:10px 0;}
      .scroller_anchor{height:0px; margin:0; padding:0;background-image:url()}
      .scroller{background:#FFF;
        background-image:url(http://krystalrae.com/img/krystalrae-2012-fall-print-leopard-sketch.jpg);
       margin:0 0 10px; z-index:100; height:50px; font-size:18px; font-weight:bold; text-align:center; width:960px;}
share|improve this question
    
Your jsfiddle has error. Make sure you do not add local resources. –  Dom Mar 18 '13 at 18:24
    
Thanks, I just realised. –  Kadeem Laurie Mar 18 '13 at 18:30
2  
Why did you say you're a beginner of JAVA? Perhaps you meant JavaScript? Bear in mind that JavaScript has absolutely nothing to do with JAVA except for the common prefix in their name :P –  Xavier_Ex Nov 15 '13 at 16:10
    
Yeah, JavaScript was only named this because of the great success (or hype as you like) of Java. Is was called LiveScript before by inventor Netscape (anyone remember?). –  HerrSerker Dec 8 '13 at 0:26
    
What browsers do you expect this to work on -- that's the biggest variant to your question. –  hharnisc Dec 9 '13 at 21:37

8 Answers 8

up vote 32 down vote accepted

You can do that with some easy jQuery:

http://jsfiddle.net/jpXjH/6/

var elementPosition = $('#navigation').offset();

$(window).scroll(function(){
        if($(window).scrollTop() > elementPosition.top){
              $('#navigation').css('position','fixed').css('top','0');
        } else {
            $('#navigation').css('position','static');
        }    
});
share|improve this answer
2  
Beware of performance issues on IE and iPad –  Huangism Mar 18 '13 at 18:34
    
Also, not all browsers will render the fixed CSS properly. All modern browsers will, but legacy browsers (or even Opera on the Nokia N900) won't fare so well. –  Julian H. Lam Mar 18 '13 at 18:40
2  
improved version jsfiddle.net/jpXjH/38 –  Badal Surana Dec 10 '13 at 8:14
    
    
Shorter scroll callback: $('#navigation').css('position', ($(window).scrollTop()>elementPosition.top) ? 'fixed' : 'relative'); (and set top:0 in your CSS) -- jsfiddle.net/mblase75/jpXjH/133 –  Blazemonger Jun 24 '14 at 20:43

There are some problems implementing this which the original accepted answer does not answer:

  1. The onscroll event of the window is firing very often. This implies that you either have to use a very performant listener, or you have to delay the listener somehow. jQuery Creator John Resig states here how a delayed mechanism can be implemented, and the reasons why you should do it. In my opinion, given todays browsers and environments, a performant listener will do as well. Here is an implementation of the pattern suggested by John Resig
  2. The way position:fixed works in css, if you scroll down the page and move an element from position:static to position: fixed, the page will "jump" a little because the document "looses" the height of the element. You can get rid of that by adding the height to the scrollTop and replace the lost height in the document body with another object. You can also use that object to determine if the sticky item has already been moved to position: fixed and reduce the calls to the code reverting position: fixed to the original state: Look at the fiddle here
  3. Now, the only expensive thing in terms of performance the handler is really doing is calling scrollTop on every call. Since the interval bound handler has also its drawbacks, I'll go as far as to argue here that you can reattach the event listener to the original scroll Event to make it feel snappier without many worries. You'll have to profile it though, on every browser you target / support. See it working here

Here's the code:

JS

/* Initialize sticky outside the event listener as a cached selector.
 * Also, initialize any needed variables outside the listener for 
 * performance reasons - no variable instantiation is happening inside the listener.
 */
var sticky = $('#sticky'),
    stickyClone,
    stickyTop = sticky.offset().top,
    scrollTop,
    scrolled = false,
    $window = $(window);

/* Bind the scroll Event */
$window.on('scroll', function (e) {
    scrollTop = $window.scrollTop();

    if (scrollTop >= stickyTop && !stickyClone) {
        /* Attach a clone to replace the "missing" body height */
        stickyClone = sticky.clone().prop('id', sticky.prop('id') + '-clone')
        stickyClone = stickyClone.insertBefore(sticky);
        sticky.addClass('fixed');
    } else if (scrollTop < stickyTop && stickyClone) {
        /* Since sticky is in the viewport again, we can remove the clone and the class */
        stickyClone.remove();
        stickyClone = null;
        sticky.removeClass('fixed');
    }
});

CSS

body {
    margin: 0
}
.sticky {
    padding: 1em;
    background: black;
    color: white;
    width: 100%
}
.sticky.fixed {
    position: fixed;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
}
.content {
    padding: 1em
}

HTML

<div class="container">
  <div id="page-above" class="content">
    <h2>Some Content above sticky</h2>
    ...some long text...
  </div>
  <div id="sticky" class="sticky">This is sticky</div>
  <div id="page-content" class="content">
    <h2>Some Random Page Content</h2>...some really long text...
  </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer

You want to use jQuery WayPoints. It is a very simple plugin and acheives exactly what you have described.

Most straightforward implementation

    $('.thing').waypoint(function(direction) {
  alert('Top of thing hit top of viewport.');
});

You will need to set some custom CSS to set exactly where it does become stuck, this is normal though for most ways to do it.

This page will show you all the examples and info that you need.

For future reference a example of it stopping and starting is this website. It is a "in the wild" example.

share|improve this answer

I wouldn't bother with jQuery or LESS. A javascript framework is overkill in my opinion.

window.addEventListener("scroll", function(evt) {

    // This value is your scroll distance from the top
    var distance_from_top = document.body.scrollTop;

    // The user has scrolled to the tippy top of the page. Set appropriate style.
    if(distance_from_top === 0){

    }

    // The user has scrolled down the page.
    if(distance_from_top > 0){

    }
});
share|improve this answer
2  
But to have broad browser compatibilty you have to use attachEvent as well. –  HerrSerker Dec 8 '13 at 0:28
1  
The question was not about browser compatibility. I was trying to keep it relevant and easy to understand. –  Shawn Whinnery Dec 13 '13 at 23:03
    
But your answer is not fully correct, if you won't go with jQuery. Because part of jQuery is the dealing with compatitibility issues. –  HerrSerker Dec 13 '13 at 23:05
2  
"The question was not about browser compatibility." –  Shawn Whinnery Dec 13 '13 at 23:06
    
It's not that I say your answer is wrong. But you could improve it a lot by adding some compatibility code. –  HerrSerker Dec 14 '13 at 19:14

You can go to LESS CSS website http://lesscss.org/

Their dockable menu is light and performs well. The only caveat is that the effect takes place after the scroll is complete. Just do a view source to see the js.

share|improve this answer
window.addEventListener("scroll", function(evt) {
    var pos_top = document.body.scrollTop;   
    if(pos_top == 0){
       $('#divID').css('position','fixed');
    }

    else if(pos_top > 0){
       $('#divId').css('position','static');
    }
});
share|improve this answer

Here you go, no frameworks, short and simple:

var el = document.getElementById('elId');
var elTop = el.getBoundingClientRect().top - document.body.getBoundingClientRect().top;

window.addEventListener('scroll', function(){
    if (document.documentElement.scrollTop > elTop){
        el.style.position = 'fixed';
        el.style.top = '0px';
    }
    else
    {
        el.style.position = 'static';
        el.style.top = 'auto';
    }
});
share|improve this answer

You can do this with css too.

just use position:fixed; for what you want to be fixed when you scroll down.

you can have some examples here:

http://davidwalsh.name/demo/css-fixed-position.php

http://demo.tutorialzine.com/2010/06/microtut-how-css-position-works/demo.html

share|improve this answer

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