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I posted an answer to this question, including a very short rant at the end about how String.Split() should accept IEnumerable<string> rather than string[].

That got me thinking. What if the base Object class from which everything else inherits provided a default implementation for IEnumerable such that everything now returns an Enumerator over exactly one item (itself) -- unless it's overridden to do something else like with collections classes.

The idea is that then if methods like String.Split() did accept IEnumerable rather than an array I could pass a single string to the function and it would just work, rather than having to much about with creating a separator array.

I'm sure there are all kinds of reasons not to do this, not the least of which is that if everything implemented IEnumerable, then the few classes where the implementation strays from the default could behave differently than you'd expect in certain scenarios. But I still thought it would be a fun exercise: what other consequences would there be?

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I wonder if I should split my answers ... –  MagicKat Sep 30 '08 at 20:54

3 Answers 3

public static IEnumerable<object> ToEnumerable(this object someObject)
{
    return System.Linq.Enumerable.Repeat(someObject, 1);
}
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Have you thought about using a helper object and implementing a Split for the IEnumerable class?

I did once make a GetDescription for the Enum class so to get the DescriptionAttribute easily. It works amazingly well.

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the index operator ([]) isn't part of the contract of IEnumerable<T> After looking at the code in reflector, the code uses the index operator heavily, which is always part of Array.

Well, simply put, Array will always have an enumerator.

The idea is that then if methods like String.Split() did accept IEnumerable rather than an array I could pass a single string to the function and it would just work, rather than having to much about with creating a separator array.

That isn't true, string inherits IEnumerable<char> And you don't have generic variance, so you can't cast IEnumerable<char> to IEnumerable<string>. You would be getting the IEnumerable<char> version(s) of split, rather then the required string.

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However, I'd prefer it if string.Join accepted IEnumerable rather than string[] as it stands now. –  Jeff Yates Sep 30 '08 at 20:36
    
It is an implementation detail. If IEnumerable support the index operator (which it doesn't) I am sure that it would be used. –  MagicKat Sep 30 '08 at 20:53
    
@Jeff Yates: Unfortunately, IEnumerable doesn't really provide a guarantee that multiple iterations will yield identical data. For String.Join to work, it has to make one pass through the list to determine the total length of all the strings, and then a second pass to actually join them together. If the two passes through the IEnumerable were to return different lengths of strings, that could result in a munged 'join' operation. –  supercat Jun 4 '11 at 20:14
    
@supercat: That guarantee isn't the responsibility of the interface, it's the responsibility of the specific instance of a type that exposes the interface. Also, there is no reason why string.Join has to perform two passes. Using a StringBuilder and a little trim at the end, it can all be done in a single pass. –  Jeff Yates Jun 5 '11 at 3:15
    
@Jeff Yates: If the string is big, StringBuilder is boatloads better than using lots of individual string concatenations, but using StringBuilder to construct a 300K string will end up generating 896K of temporary junk in the Large Object heap. Pre-counting the space required will eliminate the extra allocations and avoid any fragmentation they might cause. –  supercat Jun 5 '11 at 3:33

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