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What is the right way to define this recursive C struct in Fortran?

struct OPTION {
        char option;
        char *arg;
        struct OPTION *next;
        struct OPTION *previous;
};

I've written this Fortran code:

module resources
use iso_c_binding
implicit none
   type :: OPTION
      character(c_char) :: option
      character(c_char) :: arg
      type(OPTION), pointer :: next
      type(OPTION), pointer :: previous
   end type OPTION
end module resources

This compiles, but I think it is wrong because bind(c) in the type definition is missing. If I try to use type, bind(c) :: OPTION gfortran blames with Error: Component 'next' at (1) cannot have the POINTER attribute because it is a member of the BIND(C) derived type 'option' at (2).

And If I preserve type, bind(c) :: OPTION and remove the POINTER attribute I get Error: Component at (1) must have the POINTER attribute.

share|improve this question

You could use C-type pointers via the type(c_ptr) type:

module resources
  use iso_c_binding
  implicit none
  type, bind(c) :: OPTION
    character(c_char) :: option
    character(c_char) :: arg
    type(c_ptr) :: next
    type(c_ptr) :: previous
  end type OPTION
end module resources
share|improve this answer
    
nextand previousare type OPTION not pointer, that is my problem. – user2183564 Mar 19 '13 at 0:20
    
With type(c_ptr) you can map all C-pointers independent of their type. As noted by none_00's post, however, you will have to convert them via C_F_POINTER to access their fields. – Bálint Aradi Mar 19 '13 at 7:04

Try:

   type, bind(c) :: OPTION
      character(c_char) :: option
      character(c_char) :: arg
      type(c_ptr) :: next
      type(c_ptr) :: previous
   end type OPTION

C pointers in Fortran aren't really treated as pointers, but as a completely separate type. You'll have to convert them to Fortran pointers by C_F_POINTER to get most use out of them.

share|improve this answer

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