Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I asked this question already on http://www.cplusplus.com/forum/general/96128/ but to no avail.

does anybody experienced the same bug with g++ 4.2: internal compiler error: in make_thunk, at cp/method.c:129

I think it is not neccessary to include sample code. The respective code compiles without warnings and errors on several other newer g++ versions, as well as on clang++. It is simply correct and the bug was mentioned in the GCC's bugzilla (even several times, because it seems to recurr often), but no workaround was provided.

Please don't tell also to use a newer g++. I MUST compile it on the g++ shipped with Ubuntu Hardy, so I cannot change the compiler. Main development is done on Ubuntu Precise, but I need to keep it compatible to Hardy.

I have no idea what a thunk should be, I only suspect it has to do with covariants and/or multiple inheritance. Also I have several more similar structured header files, which all compile well, despite the only change is the name is the name of the class and I have no aim, to change that because of a compiler bug on Hardy.

Another fact is, it happens at include time.

In file included from /home/heiko/hgl/src/compiler/compilerprojectfactory.cpp:18:
/home/heiko/hgl/src/compiler/compilertype.h: In instantiation of 'HGL::Compiler::CompilerType<HGL::Vector2D, HGL::Compiler::CompilerBase>':
/home/heiko/hgl/src/compiler/compilervector2d.h:23: instantiated from here
/home/heiko/hgl/src/compiler/compilertype.h:22: internal compiler error: in make_thunk, at cp/method.c:129
Please submit a full bug report,
with preprocessed source if appropriate.
See <URL:http://gcc.gnu.org/bugs.html> for instructions.
For Debian GNU/Linux specific bug reporting instructions,
see <URL:file:///usr/share/doc/gcc-4.2/README.Bug

EDIT: Here the header which causes the bug:

#include "compilertype.h"
#include "vector2d.h"

namespace HGL {

class Vector2D;

namespace Compiler {

/**
    @author Heiko Schäfer <heiko@rangun.de>
*/
class _LOCAL Vector2D : public Compiler::CompilerType<HGL::Vector2D> {
    DISALLOW_COPY_AND_ASSIGN(Vector2D)
public:
    Vector2D(float x, float y, int line);

    using IType::operator=;

    virtual operator HGL::Vector2D &() const throw(InvalidExpressionException);
protected:
    virtual ~Vector2D();

    void append(ISerializeable::BUFFER *dest, const HGL::IType *type) const;
};

}

}

Here the template:

#include "compilerbase.h"
#include "iproject.h"
#include "util.h"

namespace HGL {

namespace Compiler {

const IProject::VSTRUCT minReq = { HGL_MINREQ_MAJOR, HGL_MINREQ_MAJOR, HGL_MINREQ_MAJOR };

template<class Type, class Base = CompilerBase>
class _LOCAL CompilerType : public Type, public Base {
    DISALLOW_COPY_AND_ASSIGN(CompilerType)
public:
    using IType::operator=;

    template<class Param>
    inline CompilerType(const Param &p, bool b, int line,
                        const IProject::VSTRUCT &vs = IProject::VSTRUCT()) :
        Type(p), Base(line, b) {
        init(vs);
    }

    template<class Param>
    inline CompilerType(const Param &p, int line,
                        const IProject::VSTRUCT &vs = IProject::VSTRUCT()) : Type(p), Base(line) {
        init(vs);
    }

    inline CompilerType(bool b, int line, const IProject::VSTRUCT &vs = IProject::VSTRUCT())
        : Type(), Base(line, b) {
        init(vs);
    }

    template<class Param1, class Param2>
    inline CompilerType(const Param1 &p1, const Param2 &p2, int line,
                        const IProject::VSTRUCT &vs = IProject::VSTRUCT()) :
        Type(p1, p2), Base(line) {
        init(vs);
    }

    template<class Param1, class Param2>
    inline CompilerType(const Param1 &p1, const Param2 &p2, bool b, int line,
                        const IProject::VSTRUCT &vs = IProject::VSTRUCT()) : Type(p1, p2),
        Base(line, b) {
        init(vs);
    }

    inline CompilerType(int line,
                        const IProject::VSTRUCT &vs = IProject::VSTRUCT()) : Type(), Base(line) {
        init(vs);
    }

    inline virtual void append(ISerializeable::BUFFER *dest, const IType *type) const {
        Base::append(dest, type);
    }

protected:
    inline virtual ~CompilerType() {}

    inline virtual void init(const IProject::VSTRUCT &vs) {
        const_cast<IProject::VSTRUCT &>(vs) = std::max(vs, minReq);
        CompilerBase::setMinRequiredVersion(vs, Type::getSerialID());
    }

};

}

}

RESOLVED!

After digging in g++ 4.2's source code I found out that it needs to now about all types in the complete tree. g++ > 4.2 apparently doesn't need this.

So, the error was in a related class which had a template member with a forwarded specialization. I just included the header instead of forwarding and g++ 4.2 was happy.

Otherwise it is really a non-nice bug not to give an error, but this useless message.

share|improve this question
    
It is necessary to include the code. Preferably, provide a SSCCE. –  Daniel Frey Mar 18 '13 at 18:47
    
I don't have access to gcc 4.2 right now, but could _LOCAL have anything to do with it? Names starting with _ are reserved for the implementation, so you could potentially be walking over some internal g++ stuff. –  juanchopanza Mar 18 '13 at 19:04
    
You should reduce it to an SCCEE, this will probably already help you to solve the problem yourself. My guess would be that you have a problem with the instantiation order, as older GCCs instantiated some classes during stage 1 instead of stage 2 AFAIR. But it's impossible to tell from just seeing some fragments, so... the SSCCE is your homework now ;) –  Daniel Frey Mar 18 '13 at 19:04
1  
@juanchopanza: <pre>_LOCAL</pre> was not the cause, tries it :-( –  Heiko Schäfer Mar 18 '13 at 19:16
    
@DanielFrey How could I make an SCCEE if it is a mystery for me. The code compiles well and I get this bug not so often. I have no plan, how I could do a SCCEE reproduing it. Sorry. Even more strange, I have classes with are almost identical headers and they work, further I checked the SVN history for the last change on the files and there have been a few days none. I'm just out of ideas. –  Heiko Schäfer Mar 18 '13 at 19:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A thunk or trampoline is a piece of code that is added in some implementations of dynamic dispatch to adapt the interface of the base virtual function with respect to the final overrider being used. As you mentioned it is commonly needed to adapt the this pointer in multiple/virtual inheritance (for bases listed after the first non-empty one) and to adapt the resulting pointer/reference with covariant return types.

The error indicates that it is a compiler bug. If you have to use that particular compiler you will need to work around the issue, and that will involve changing your design. You can try to limit the use of multiple/virtual inheritance, reorder the bases in the list or try to play around until you manage to get the compiler to digest that code somehow. If it is a problem when generating the adapter for a covariant return type, consider removing the covariant return and provide an overload (with a different name) that will return the covariant type (i.e. replace covariant return with a non-virtual function returning the most derived type and a virtual function that calls the previous and returns a reference to the base).

Other than those generic hints, without seeing the code you have and the implementation of the compiler there is little else to say.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for at least the explanation of thunk. A redesign is out of question. Since I have some almost identical interfaces which work, I'm at the moment checking where the fatal small difference could be. –  Heiko Schäfer Mar 18 '13 at 19:33
    
@HeikoSchäfer: Remember this is a compiler bug, that you have something similar working does not mean the compiler will like this particular case for maybe some absurd apparently unrelated. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 18 '13 at 19:41
    
Sorry, somehow I wasn't allowed to make a +1 on your answer. If found the cause of the bug, the real bug is, that it is the wrong bug message. I digged into the g++ code and tried to find out what causes this gcc_assert. I note the solution below my post. –  Heiko Schäfer Mar 18 '13 at 19:50
    
@HeikoSchäfer: You should post that as an answer and accept it, rather than accepting this generic babbling that is not really the core issue you were facing. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 18 '13 at 22:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.