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For the purpose of concept demonstration in c++ I need to use some placeholder naming scheme for types, functions, variables e.g. Foobar. Having several different entities to name and differentiate ending up with foo/bar alone used at the same time for classes, functions, member variables is not visually differentiating. Is there some useful placeholder naming scheme for these entities?

enum Enum1 { ... }

struct Struct1 { ... }

class Class1
{
public:
    void function1();
    void function2();
    ...
private:
    int variable1;
    int variable2;
    ...
}

With foo/bar alone for types, functions and variables the distinction is not so evident

enum Foo { ... }

struct Bar { ... }

class Foo
{
public:
    void foo();
    void bar();
    void baz();
private:
    int foo_;
    int bar_;
}
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closed as not constructive by Bo Persson, Radu Murzea, spajce, DarkAjax, Code-Apprentice Mar 18 '13 at 20:47

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5  
Your best bet is to come up with realistic example. If you can't do that, at least name them in a way that makes it clearer. Even if it's function1, function2, etc., at least we then know they're functions at a glance. Name things after the role they have in your example. –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 18 '13 at 18:56
    
naming function1, function2, or foo1, bar2, etc... is not so appealing. is there a common area with large number of named entities for e.g. types? banking area? –  Chesnokov Yuriy Mar 18 '13 at 19:03
    
If the question is indeed about teaching, then this should be reflected in the question title and the tags. Explaining OOP concepts to a beginner is quite a specific case. IMHO. –  Ivan Mar 18 '13 at 20:26
    
Also, remember that you can (and should, if applicable) approve an answer even though the question was closed. –  Ivan Mar 18 '13 at 22:02

2 Answers 2

As far as I understand, such examples can suite well to be used to illustrate expressions, syntax or architectural patterns but not algorithms or business logic parts. Whenever you seek to illustrate the last you should really consider using meaningful names explaining their role in the algorithm.

As for me, I usually go with foo/bar/moo/boo etc. This does the job quite well as far as the example is reasonably short.

If the example is not short enough and the case is that emphasizing on the type (like a function or, say, an array) seems to facilitate readability, functionA/functionB can be used as an alternative - it seems easier (than with numbers) to read and manipulate such names in mind IMHO. Numbers can distract.

Another way (plays particularly well for me when discussing SQL queries but can be useful in some C++ cases too) is using primitive real-life entities like class Person and class Employee as a subclass.

If you seek to demonstrate OOP examples to a non-specialist, Foo/Bar/Function1 are absolutely not an option in this case: only the brightest of your students will get the idea then. My first OOP example was a lightbulb with turn on and turn off methods, isOn property, colour and power properties. It can be extended with a fluorescent or a incandescent lamp subclass and encapsulated in a desk lamp class. If you go further in OOP and introduce interfaces it can also implement ac-powered and/or dc-powered interfaces.

Using Foo/Bar etc. is only relevant when communicating to people of equal or higher experience than of yours - those having full understanding of the language already (e.g when you ask a question like of "should I use foo + bar or foo.plus(bar)?" kind).

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The Employee type hierarchy usually leads to demonstrations of anti-patterns (i.e. trying to put either hourly rate/salary/commission in the base class, when it doesn't apply to all subclasses). Unfortunately these anti-patterns are often presented in a favorable light. –  Ben Voigt Mar 18 '13 at 19:44
    
yes, more suitable area is needed for demonstration of OOP examples –  Chesnokov Yuriy Mar 18 '13 at 19:45
1  
If you seek to demonstrate OOP examples to a non-specialist, @ChesnokovYuriy, you should definitely go with Ben's suggestion about the animals. Foo/Bar/Function1 are absolutely not an option in this case: only the brightest of your students will get the idea then. My first OOP example was a lightbulb with turn on and turn off methods, isOn property, colour and power properties. It can be extended with a fluorescent or a incandescent lamp subclass and encapsulated in a desk lamp class. If you go further in OOP and introduce interfaces it can also implement ac-powered and/or dc-powered interf. –  Ivan Mar 18 '13 at 19:53
    
Using Foo/Bar etc. is only relevant when communicating to people of equal or higher experience than of yours - those having full understanding of the language. –  Ivan Mar 18 '13 at 20:00
    
I also think the method term should be used instead of a function when speaking about an object model. –  Ivan Mar 18 '13 at 20:09

Animals are frequently used for illustrating object-oriented programming. They come with nice homogenous and heterogenous behaviors (eat, bark), relationship trees (Dalmatian is-a Dog, Dog has-a Tail), etc.

Of course, the same problems can be solved via non-OOP techniques... the same attributes then usefully illustrate the relationship between dynamic polymorphism via virtual functions, template specialization, adapters, enable-if, etc.

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thanks. OOP is what I'm looking for. animals is suitable –  Chesnokov Yuriy Mar 18 '13 at 19:40
    
more leaning towards selection of some realistic area for OOP placeholder naming –  Chesnokov Yuriy Mar 18 '13 at 19:44

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