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I noticed I have two alternatives to writing to a file in Linux within a python script. I can either create a Popen object and write to a file using shell redirection (e.g. ">" or ">>") - or I can use File Objects (e.g. open(), write(), close()).

I've played around with both for a short while and noticed that using Popen involves less code if I need to use other shell tools. For instance, below I try to get a checksum of a file and write it to a temporary file named with the PID as a unique identifier. (I know $$ will change if I call Popen again but pretend I don't need to):

Popen("md5sum " + filename + " >> /dir/test/$$.tempfile", shell=True, stdout=PIPE).communicate()[0]

Below is a (hastily written) rough equivalent using file objects. I use os.getpid instead of $$ but I still use md5sum and have to call Popen still.

PID = str(os.getpid())
manifest = open('/dir/test/' + PID + '.tempfile','w')
hash = Popen("md5sum " + filename, shell=True, stdout=PIPE).communicate()[0]
manifest.write(hash)
manifest.close()

Are there any pros/cons to either approach? I'm actually trying to port bash code over to Python and would like to use more Python, but I'm not sure which way I should go here.

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2 Answers 2

Generally speaking, I would write something like:

manifest = open('/dir/test/' + PID + '.tempfile','w')
p = Popen(['md5sum',filename],stdout=manifest)
p.wait()
manifest.close()

This avoids any shell injection vulnerabilities. You also know the PID as you're not picking up the PID of the spawned subshell.

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Edit: md5 module is deprecated (but still around), instead you should use the hashlib module

hashlib version

to file:

import hashlib
with open('py_md5', mode='w') as out:
    with open('test.txt', mode='ro') as input:
        out.write(hashlib.md5(input.read()).hexdigest())

to console:

import hashlib
with open('test.txt', mode='ro') as input:
    print hashlib.md5(input.read()).hexdigest()

md5 version Python's md5 module provides an identical tool:

import md5
# open file to write
with open('py_md5', mode='w') as out:
    with open('test.txt', mode='ro') as input:
        out.write(md5.new(input.read()).hexdigest())

If you just wanted to get the md5 hexadecimal digest string, you can print it insted of writing it out to a file:

import md5
# open file to write
with open('test.txt', mode='ro') as input:
    print md5.new(input.read()).hexdigest()
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